Finalmente un sano revisionismo sulla nostra grande guerra da parte anglosassone

Full Version   Print   Search   Utenti   Join     Share : FacebookTwitter
Pius Augustus
00Friday, October 3, 2008 9:16 PM
Jon Latimer on life and death on the Italian front

For too long there has been a fatuous contempt for the Italian soldier in Anglophone countries, largely as a result of systemic Italian failures during the Second World War, which Allied propaganda played up.

The truth is that Italians were tough and hardy, and on many occasions fought with a bravery to match any soldier in the world. It takes more courage, not less, to enter battle with obsolete, second-rate equipment and an inept doctrine. Far too many people forget that, during the First World War, Italy fought with the Allies and lost 689,000 soldiers from a population of 37million, proportionately a greater loss than Britain's.
advertisement
<A HREF="http://ads.telegraph.co.uk/event.ng/Type=click&FlightID=31280&AdID=38654&TargetID=4580&Values=5966&ASeg=&AMod=&Redirect=https://secure.widearea.co.uk/wt/campaigns/1000539/1GOCCDD.html" target="_top"><IMG SRC="http://adc.telegraph.co.uk/h/house/for-gifs_mpu.gif" WIDTH=300 HEIGHT=250 BORDER=0></A>

Mark Thompson has addressed a gap in our understanding with this study of the Italian front, written largely from the Italian perspective. He begins by addressing motivation for joining the war: mainly self-interest and the dream of "redeeming" lands from the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Italy regarded the war as one of independence and its aims were always openly expansionist. It not only claimed Trieste and Trentino but wanted to grab Istria, Dalmatia and Albania to "guarantee" its security.

However, the demands of bourgeois nationalists were of little concern to the peasantry, and no one told them why they had to fight and die in such numbers; government and press lied to them, they were under-paid, under-equipped and under-fed.

For most Italians, the war was "an experience marked by brutality, contempt, corruption and oppression".

The dominating figure was the chief of general staff, General Luigi Cadorna, a man of colossal arrogance who cared not a fig for his men, and regarded his abilities as verging on the Napoleonic, despite his only method being to deploy as many troops along as broad a sector as possible, in the hope that the Austrian lines would crack somewhere.

Egged on by nationalists, he attacked again and again along the Isonzo valley, in a vain attempt to reach Trieste. After 11 bloody assaults, the 12th battle - known as Caporetto - saw the army thrown back 100 miles to the Piave River, near Venice. Caporetto became a byword for disaster and Cadorna was dismissed.

How he retained control for so long can be traced to the mixture of militarism and nationalism that took Italy into the war, and presaged the rise to power of Benito Mussolini shortly afterwards.

For if the war itself was tragic then, as one survivor recalled: "Everything we hated about Austria…the suppression of liberty in general and the press in particular…the huge power of militarism - all this came back to life in fascist Italy, in an even worse form." It is in tracing political developments that the great strength of the book lies, but Thompson also casts a fascinating light on the Italian spirit with a detailed examination of war poetry.

Our view of the war has been framed by British poets but Italian experiences affected their national consciousness quite differently. This is partly due to political developments, for the sense of Italy as a nation remained vague, yet the path of nationalism could be seen unfolding in the rise of Futurism.

If today's political situation in Italy gives cause for concern, this book is an excellent place to start trying to understand it.
Bag End
00Friday, October 3, 2008 10:04 PM
La lettura di questo topic mi fa sorgere una domanda: ma gli inglesi hanno sempre pensato che nel 1939 gli italiani erano tutti fascisti, e contenti del fascismo? [SM=x278661]
Pius Augustus
00Saturday, October 4, 2008 10:44 AM
Re:
Bag End, 03/10/2008 22.04:

La lettura di questo topic mi fa sorgere una domanda: ma gli inglesi hanno sempre pensato che nel 1939 gli italiani erano tutti fascisti, e contenti del fascismo? [SM=x278661]




Temo che questo loro credere fosse tristemente vicino alla verità...
Bag End
00Saturday, October 4, 2008 1:45 PM
Re: Re:
Pius Augustus, 04/10/2008 10.44:




Temo che questo loro credere fosse tristemente vicino alla verità...



Di quello che dicono i libri di storia non mi fido più tanto, però nella cerchia di persone che conosco (e parlo di gente nata negli anni '30-'40 del secolo scorso) c'è un sacco di gente, o c'era, perchè qualcuno non è più qui, che non era fascista e non era contento del fascismo.
La resistenza c'è stata, troppo tardi per evitare certi danni, ma c'è stata.
Pius Augustus
00Saturday, October 4, 2008 9:25 PM
Re: Re: Re:
Bag End, 04/10/2008 13.45:



Di quello che dicono i libri di storia non mi fido più tanto, però nella cerchia di persone che conosco (e parlo di gente nata negli anni '30-'40 del secolo scorso) c'è un sacco di gente, o c'era, perchè qualcuno non è più qui, che non era fascista e non era contento del fascismo.
La resistenza c'è stata, troppo tardi per evitare certi danni, ma c'è stata.




c'è stata (ed è stata comunque minoritaria), quando il fascismo aveva dimostrato la sua inconsistenza in guerra.In precedenza gli italiani forse non avevano creduto per la maggior parte al fascismo,ma di certo lo avevano tollerato ed accettato.
Bag End
00Sunday, October 5, 2008 7:10 PM
Re: Re: Re: Re:
Pius Augustus, 04/10/2008 21.25:




c'è stata (ed è stata comunque minoritaria), quando il fascismo aveva dimostrato la sua inconsistenza in guerra.In precedenza gli italiani forse non avevano creduto per la maggior parte al fascismo,ma di certo lo avevano tollerato ed accettato.




Non sono d'accordo sul tollerato e accettato. Subito credo che sia la parola giusta, almeno per molti. Forse non la maggioranza, ma molti lo hanno subito. Mia madre delle purghe si ricorda benissimo, anche se lei non le ha prese direttamente perchè piccina.
Pius Augustus
00Sunday, October 5, 2008 10:18 PM
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:
Bag End, 05/10/2008 19.10:




Non sono d'accordo sul tollerato e accettato. Subito credo che sia la parola giusta, almeno per molti. Forse non la maggioranza, ma molti lo hanno subito. Mia madre delle purghe si ricorda benissimo, anche se lei non le ha prese direttamente perchè piccina.




Certo,ogni stato totalitario si regge anche sulla repressione e la forza,ma senza consenso non va avanti.E tristemente il fascismo ne aveva molto.
DarkWalker
00Tuesday, October 7, 2008 11:38 AM
mah, insomma, non credo che la ceause del quadro politico italiano oggi siano da ricercare nella IGM o nel fascismo. Però probabilmente dovrei leggere il resto del libro^^

Sul consenso, non saprei, le istituzioni (democratiche-)liberali non ebbero abbastanza tempo per radicarsi nelle masse (specie in periodo alquanto travagliato da guerra, post guerra e crisi economica). Se aggiungiamo che nessuno -in Italia- andava a dire agli italiani che la loro percezione della realtà era del tutto distorta dalla censura si può anche capire come fu facile ottenere e mantenere il consenso.

Storicamente la resistenza si fa partire dall'assassinio di Matteotti, ma ebbe una incidenza "popolare" solo quando, a metà guerra, l'ottica distorta di cui sopra fu spazzata via dall'evidenza dei fatti.
Questa è la versione 'lo-fi' del Forum Per visualizzare la versione completa click here
Tutti gli orari sono GMT+01:00. Adesso sono le 6:48 PM.
Copyright © 2000-2024 FFZ srl - www.freeforumzone.com