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NEWS ABOUT BENEDICT

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11/22/2007 4:23 PM
 
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THE POPE'S DAY

The Holy Father met today with
- Bishops of Kenya, Group 6, on ad-limina visit.
- Participants of the General Conference of the UN Food and Agricultural Organization. Address in English

.
CARDINALS MEET TOMORROW
TO DISCUSS ECUMENISM


VATICAN CITY, NOV 22, 2007 (VIS) - At midday today, the Holy See Press Office released the following communique:

"The ordinary Public Consistory for the creation of 23 new cardinals will be preceded - tomorrow, November 23 - by a meeting of prayer and reflection of the College of Cardinals, to take place in the Vatican's New Synod Hall. After praying the Middle Hour (Terce), at 9.30 a.m. the Holy Father will greet the cardinals present. Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity will then deliver a report on the theme: 'Information, reflections and evaluation concerning the current moment in ecumenical dialogue.' This will be followed by contributions from the cardinals, lasting until 12.30 p.m.

"The meeting will resume at 5 p.m. with the celebration of Vespers. Then, following an introduction by the Holy Father, a free exchange of ideas will take place between the cardinals on the life of the Church in general. The day of prayer and reflection will conclude at 7 p.m. with an address by the Supreme Pontiff."


POPE BENEDICT TP U.N. FOOD ORGANIZATION:
'ENSURE THAT NO ONE WILL EVER BE HUNGRY AGAIN'


VATICAN CITY, NOV 22, 2007 (VIS) - At midday today, the Pope received participants in the 34th general conference of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), which has its headquarters in Rome.

In his English-language talk to the delegates, the Pope indicated that "all forms of discrimination, and particularly those that thwart agricultural development, must be rejected since they constitute a violation of the basic right of every person to be 'free from hunger.' These convictions are in fact demanded by the very nature of your work on behalf of the common good of humanity."

Benedict XVI highlighted the paradox of "the relentless spread of poverty in a world that is also experiencing unprecedented prosperity, not only in the economic sphere but also in the rapidly developing fields of science and technology."

Such obstacles as "armed conflicts, outbreaks of disease, adverse atmospheric and environmental conditions and the massive forced displacement of peoples," said the Pope, "should serve as a motivation to redouble our efforts to provide each person with his or her daily bread.

"For her part, the Church is convinced that the quest for more effective technical solutions in an ever-changing and expanding world calls for far- sighted programs embodying enduring values grounded in the inalienable dignity and rights of the human person," he added.

"The united effort of the international community to eliminate malnutrition and promote genuine development necessarily calls for clear structures of management and supervision, and a realistic assessment of the resources needed to address a wide range of different situations. It requires the contribution of every member of society - individuals, volunteer organizations, businesses, and local and national governments - always with due regard for those ethical and moral principles which are the common patrimony of all people and the foundation of all social life."

Benedict XVI continued his talk by saying that "today more than ever, the human family needs to find the tools and strategies capable of overcoming the conflicts caused by social differences, ethnic rivalries, and the gross disparity in levels of economic development."

"Religion, as a potent spiritual force for healing the wounds of conflict and division, has its own distinctive contribution to make in this regard, especially through the work of forming minds and hearts in accordance with a vision of the human person."

"Technical progress, important as it is, is not everything," the Pope told the FAO delegates. "Progress must be placed within the wider context of the integral good of the human person. It must constantly draw nourishment from the common patrimony of values which can inspire concrete initiatives aimed at a more equitable distribution of spiritual and material goods."

"This principle," he explained, "has a special application to the world of agriculture, in which the work of those who are often considered the 'lowliest' members of society should be duly acknowledged and esteemed."

In conclusion the Holy Father recalled how "FAO's outstanding activity on behalf of development and food security clearly points to the correlation between the spread of poverty and the denial of basic human rights, beginning with the fundamental right to adequate nutrition. Peace, prosperity, and respect for human rights are inseparably linked. The time has come to ensure, for the sake of peace, that no man, woman and child will ever be hungry again!"


From yesterday's GA [too bad the watermarks!]:




[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/22/2007 11:50 PM]
11/22/2007 9:44 PM
 
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CONSISTORY FEVER


Cardinal Bertone says papal criteria
for naming new cardinals not based
on 'proportional representation'




Among the 23 new cardinals are above, from left, Brady of Ireland,
Sandri of Argentina, Foley of Philadelphia; and below, from left,
DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, Dellay of Iraq; Lajolo of Italy;
Scherer of Brazil
.



The following is summarized and translated fron Avvenire, which has a mini-special today on the Consistory which I would not have time to translate in toto:


“The College of Cardinals is not and cannot be a mere assembly where the local Churches are represented in democratic manner,” Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone told Avvenire yesterday in reply to criticisms that Pope Benedict XVI’s recent nominations have changed the balance of an eventual conclave in favor of Europe, particularly Italy, at the expense of the so-called ‘Catholic South” (Latin America and Africa).

“The Pope has sovereign freedom to choose new cardinals, and if one looks only at a direct mathematical relation between the number of Catholics in a geographical region and the number of cardinals from that region, then there will be an apparent disequilibrium. But the distribution is better understood in relation to the number of bishops and priests in a region."

Avvenire cites an article to appear in 30 GIORNI shortly which examines the issue. According to the article, the three nations with the largest Catholic populations are under-represented if population were the only basis for naming new cardinals: Brazil, with 156 million Catholics, has 4 cardinals; Mexico, with 96 million, has 4; and the Philippines, with 69 million, has 2 cardinals.

On the other hand, the two countries that have the greatest number of bishops and priests also have the most cardinals: Italy with more than 51,000 priests and more than 500 bishops, has 21; and the United States, with more than 45,000 priests and 430 bishops, has 17 (4 older than 80).

Of interest, Avvenire cites a column by John Allen in National Catholic Reporter which points out, among other things, that

(The Pope) did not redistribute cardinals to the global South, where two-thirds of Catholics now live, but instead slightly bolstered the over-representation of Europeans. See freeforumzone.leonardo.it/discussione.aspx?idd=354494&p=134

I commented then:

I think Allen is making too much of geographical representation, as though the Pope is expressing geographical favoritism (read pro-Europe) by his choices. There are obviously other considerations besides geography.

And in that respect, although the global 'south' undoubtedly has the majority of Catholics in the world today, it does not automatically mean that they have enough prelates immediately worthy to be named cardinal.

Since most of Asia and Africa have much 'newer' churches and/or their history of Catholicism has started much later than in traditional Catholic lands, their local churches have obviously not had enough time to build up a 'bench' of prelates qualified to be named cardinal (or if they are by inherent merit, perhaps not yet in terms of pastoral experience).

Latin America is a different case. Although it has been Catholic since the 16th century, perhaps the record of its bishops has not been so sterling as to merit more nominations to the College of Cardinals.

After all, every cardinal named is theoretically a potential Pope.



P.S. 11/22 7:30 PM EST
here is Allen himself reacting to Bertone's 'response':



Bertone replies to NCR analysis
on membership of College of Cardinals

By JOHN L. ALLEN JR.
Rome
Posted on Nov 22, 2007


Responding to accounts in the National Catholic Reporter and elsewhere suggesting that the College of Cardinals is top-heavy with Europeans and North Americans, the Vatican’s Secretary of State said today that the make-up of the college is actually broadly proportionate to the distribution of priests and bishops in the world.

Moreover, Italian Cardinal Taricisio Bertone said, the College of Cardinals “is not, and cannot be, a mere assembly in which the various local churches are represented using democratic methods.”

Bertone’s comments came in an interview with L’Avvenire, the official newspaper of the Italian bishops’ conference. Italian journalist Gianni Cardinale asked Bertone to respond to articles in NCR and the Italian news agency ANSA suggesting that Latin America, Africa and Asia are under-represented among the cardinals.

That Oct. 19 NCR piece observed that, “Two-thirds of the cardinals come from the global North, while two-thirds of the Catholic people live in the South.”

In response, Bertone made two points.

“The pope is free in a sovereign sense in the choice of cardinals,” Bertone said. “If one considers only in a mathematical sense the relationship between the faithful and the cardinals, it could perhaps seem unequal; but if one looks more carefully at the data on the distribution of priests and bishops in the world, the proportions appear more balanced.”

“In any event, the fact remains that the College of Cardinals is not, and cannot be, a mere assembly in which the various local churches are represented using democratic methods. It is entirely different, as popes have repeatedly explained in the speeches and homilies given during the consistories.”

In an accompanying piece, Cardinale observes that the two countries with the largest number of cardinals under the age of 80 and thus able to vote for the next pope, Italy (21) and the United States (13), are also those with the largest numbers of bishops and priests. Italy has more than 51,000 priests and over 500 bishops, while the United States has over 45,000 priests and more than 430 bishops.

The suggestion is that Benedict XVI’s recent choices of new members for the College of Cardinals may not be in line with the total number of Catholics in various regions of the world, but it does more accurately reflect the distribution of clergy.

Cardinale writes that a forthcoming issue of 30 Giorni, a widely read Italian Catholic publication, will contain a more detailed statistical breakdown.


Members of the College of Cardinals will gather on Friday for a “business meeting” with Pope Benedict XVI, the second such gathering of Benedict’s papacy. The first came on March 23, 2006, to discuss several issues, including the idea of a document widening permission for celebration of the old Latin Mass in use prior to the Second Vatican Council (1962-65). That document eventually appeared in July 2007.

Tomorrow, the cardinals are to discuss ecumenism in the morning, beginning with a presentation by Cardinal Walter Kasper, the Vatican’s top ecumenical officer. The afternoon is devoted to free discussion for whatever issues the cardinals themselves wish to raise.

====================================================================

The head of Italian state TV's Vatican bureau writes an overview of the new consistory in a historical context, translated from Il Tempo today:


Cardinal regalia on display at Gammarelli, Rome's premier ecclesiastical haberdasher.


'Up to shedding blood'
By GIUSEPPE DE CARLI

«Usque ad sanguinis effusionem» - ‘up to shedding blood’ – is the solemn formula promounced by the Pope when he places the cardinal’s hat (biretta) on a new cardinal of the church and assigns him his titular church.

The new Princes of the Church kneel before the Pope at this time. The consistory on Saturday, November 13, is not sacramental. But its brilliant ritual has a sense of grandeur and universal breadth, as well as the vocation of martyrdom which is implied in the office and the title it carries.

It is the second consistory of the Ratzinger era, with 23 new cardinals, 18 of whom will be electors in a future Conclave, and 5 over the elector age of 80.

«Accipe anulum de manu Petri» - “Accept the ring from the hands of Peter” – Benedict XVI will tell them at the Eucharistic concelebration on Sunday at which he will give them their ring of office.

These are extraordinary words that belong only to an institution which is the only one on the face of the earth which gives the possibility to any of its faithful to become an absolute monarch, which the Pope is, in earthly terms. Or to become a ‘prince of the blood’ with the title of Eminence – when one becomes a cardinal and, theoretically, a potential Pope.

The College of Cardinals has been called the most exclusive club in the world. From having become in the last few centuries a symbol of earthly power and glory, the cardinalate, under John Paul II, has returned to the idea of a heroic life offered in the service of the Church, marked, if need be, by difficulties, suffering and even persecution.

Having reported the live broadcasts of consistories in the past 20 years, I see vividly in my mind the luminous figures of priests and bishops coming from the so-called ‘silent churches’ – the Churches of the East, under the communist regime - who were rasied to this honor.

People like the Albanian parish priest Michel Koliqi, who could not walk up the steps towards the Pope and was carried up to him like a fragile twig, named cardinal at age 92. The scarlet to seal a life and a history of decades in prison and torture.

Or the tears of the Romanian Alecander Todea, whose persecutors made him believe that his mother had died of a broken heart because he ahd refused to turn Orthodox.

Or Miroslav Vlk, the current Archbishop of Prague, who spent his prison years as a humble dishwasher and bootblack. Vinko Pulic, of the martyr city of Sarajevo. The Vietnamese Van Thuan, who chose to continue wearing a pectoral cross fashioned of barbed wire given to him by his jailers. The Chinese Ignatius Gong Pin-mei, who had been condemned to life in prison for being a ‘counter-revolutionary’. The Byelorussian Kasimierz Swiatek, deported by the Soviets to a Siberian gulag simply for being Catholic.

John Paul II also used the cardinalate to force political equilibrium, to denounce the sufferings of Christian communities, or even the ‘tragic utopia’ of socialism. Thus, Gabriel Zbeir Wako, archbishop of Khartoum, capital of a Sudan where the generals sought to impose sharia as national law. Or in Italy itself, great communicators like Ersilio Tonini, emeritus archbishop of Ravenna.

They were among John Paul II’s cardinals, and it is with people like them that perhaps, public opinion has changed about these men who are dressed in the red of blood and martyrdom.

Only to these ‘men in red’, beginning in 1059, has been entrusted the privilege of electing a new Pope by secret vote. But it was the Second Vatican Council that ‘took away’ the Renaissance-era magnificence that had made the cardinalate a supreme ambition for centuries among members of the Roman aristocratic families.

The post-Vatican-II cardinal has been rid of encumbrances, honorifics and glories from such a past, as well as of extravagant ritual garments that included a 5-meter-long train, and the so-called ‘cardinal’s courts (which were exactly like miniature royal courts).

Today, even a cardinal who works with the Curia in Rome is entitled to no more than a rent-free apartment and two nuns to take care of housekeeping and secretarial work. [Cardinal Ratzinger obviously took no advantage of the latter prerogative – as he had his sister first, and then Ingrid Stampa, for both his housekeeping and personal secretarial work. Birgit Wansing was his office secretary in the conventional sense, and therefore, en employe at CDF.]

And the so-called ‘cardinal’s silver platter’, what he draws from the Church coffers, about which many a legend has been told, amounts to no more than 3,000 euros a month for the prefect or president of a Vatican dicastery.

Finally, even the spirit with which the new cardinals step across this last step has changed radically(see the interview with Cardinal-elect Angelo Comastri, arch-priest of St. Peter’s basilica).

With the consistory on Saturday, the cardinal electors will fill up the maximum number of 120 established by Paul VI, and which Benedict XVI appears committed to keep.

For the first time ever, there will be an equal number of non-European cardinals as Europeans. There are nine Africans; 37 from the Americas; 12 from Asia and Oceania. [I must check other reports- these only total 58, there should be 60].There are 60 cardinals from Europe – 21 of them Italians (or one-sixth of the electors).

A signal nomination is the Patriarch of Babylonia of the Chaldeans, His Beatitude Emmanuel III Delay, Archbishop of Baghdad, named just before reaching his 80th birthday.

Internationality, pastorality and exemplariness: these appear to be the criteria which Papa Ratzinger has used for his nominations for cardinal. To be sealed by the exhortation to serve the Church ‘up to shedding one’s blood’, the solemn reminder for anyone who holds this high office.

Il Tempo, 22 novembre 2007

==================================================================

Pre-consistory Meeting
to Focus on Ecumenism



VATICAN CITY, NOV. 22, 2007 (Zenit.org).- As cardinals from around the world arrive to Rome to welcome 23 new members to their college, the day before Saturday's consistory will be marked by prayer and reflection on ecumenism.

The Vatican press office released a communiqué today announcing the details of the special meeting that will begin with prayer and then a greeting from Benedict XVI.

Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, will deliver a report titled "Information, Reflections and Evaluation Concerning the Current Moment in Ecumenical Dialogue." Other cardinals will also make contributions on the theme of ecumenism.

The cardinals' meeting comes just a few days after the release of the final document from the Oct. 8-14 plenary assembly of the Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue Between the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church.

The conclusion of that assembly was what Cardinal Kasper referred to as a "modest first step," noting that "for the first time the Orthodox Churches have said yes, this universal level of the Church exists and also at the universal level there is conciliarity, synodality and authority; this means that there is also a primate; according to the practice of the ancient Church, the first bishop is the Bishop of Rome."

The College of Cardinals will later turn attention to the life of the Church in general, with a free exchange of ideas Friday evening. The day of prayer and reflection will conclude with an address by the Holy Father.

Cardinal Araujo Sales, retired archbishop of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, told ZENIT that "these meetings of the College of Cardinals help a lot in preventing anything that could damage the unity of the Church and the role of the Pope. They help to confront the challenges of today's world, according to Christ's command: 'That they may be one.'"

[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/23/2007 10:07 PM]
11/22/2007 10:40 PM
 
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BENEDICT XVI WILL SIGN SECOND ENCYCLICAL ON NOVEMBER 30


Arriving at the General Audience yesterday.


Here's a bulletin from the Italian news agency ANSA, translated here:

VATICAN CITY, Nov. 22 (ANSA)- Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone announced today that Pope Benedict XVI will sign his second encyclical, Spe salvi (Hope saves), on November 30, feast of St. Andrew.

But it will not be released until translations into the Vatican's official languages from the Latin original are done. This may take a few more weeks. It seems the Vatican wishes to release it by Christmas, itself a Christian symbol of hope.

The date chosen by the Pope for the encyclical is significant. St. Andrew, brother of St. Peter, is considered by the Orthodox to have been the first Bishop of Byzantium (later Constantinople) and is the patron of Russia, Ukraine and Rumania.

This may be seen as Benedict's explicit homage to the anicent Eastern Churches an the present Orthodox world.

Bertone, who spoke to reporters after addressing an international cofnrence of church institutions involved in wr=orking for justice and peace, did not give any other details about the Pope's second encyclical.

Its reported title is Spe salvi, strictly translated as 'Saved thanks to hope', a meditation that takes off from a passage in St. Paul's Letter to the Corinthians who defined hope, along with love and faith, as the three theological virtues of Christianity.

Hope is a theme that recurs in Pope Benedict's pronouncements.

"In the face of the changing and complex panorama that we have today," he said recently, "the virtue of hope has been put to a hard test in the community of believers. Nevertheless, it is our faithful trust in God which is the virtue that allows Christians not to be overcome by pessimism, nihilism or human failings."

Against Nietszche who defined hope as 'the virtue of the weak', Pope Benedict sees hope as one of the cornerstones of Christian life.

Apparently, the Pope worked on the encyclical during his summer vacation in Lorenzago and during the rest of his summer sojourn in Castel Gandolfo, completing it on his return to the Vatican.

It took precedence over another encyclical which he intends to publish dedicated to social issues, which may now be pushed back to a spring 2008 publication.

It may tie in with the question of natural law, another subject mentioned with frequency lately by Benedict XVI.

In his speech to the peace and justice confrence, Cardinal Bertone said that "John Paul II had planned to publish an encyclical using natural law as a platform and starting point for dialog with believers and non-believers alike."

He cited John Paul II's statement in his own social encyclical Centesimus Annus that "No authentic progress is possible without respect for the natuural and original law to recognize the truth and live according to it."


[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/22/2007 11:41 PM]
11/23/2007 3:32 PM
 
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Cardinals discuss other Christians
By NICOLE WINFIELD






Left photo, Cardinal Bertone greets arriving cardinals at the Vatican this morning.

VATICAN CITY, Nov. 23 (AP) - Cardinals from around the world gathered here Friday for a daylong meeting on the Catholic Church's relations with other Christians ahead of a ceremony Saturday to elevate 23 churchmen to the top ranks of the Catholic hierarchy.

Pope Benedict XVI greeted the cardinals and cardinal-designates in a Vatican audience hall before the prelates prayed and set down to business behind closed doors.

Cardinal Walter Kasper, in charge of the Vatican's relations with other Christians, led the discussion, briefing the group on the Vatican's dealings with Protestants, Anglicans and other Christians, the Vatican said.

His talk was also expected to include details of a new document approved by a Vatican-Orthodox theological commission that has been working to heal the 1,000-year schism between the Catholic and Orthodox churches.

In the document, Catholic and Orthodox representatives both agreed that the pope has primacy over all bishops — although they disagreed over just what authority that primacy gives him.

The agreement is significant since the Great Schism of 1054 — which split the Catholic and Orthodox churches — was precipitated largely by disagreements over the primacy of the pope.

Kasper called the document an "important development" since it marked the first time that Orthodox churches had agreed that there is a "universal level" of the church, that it has a primate, and that according to ancient church practice, that leader is the bishop of Rome — the pope.

"This document is a modest first step, and as such it gives rise to hope, but we must not exaggerate its importance," he told Vatican Radio recently.

Kasper said that participants at the meeting in Ravenna, where the document was approved last month, didn't discuss the more vexing issues of what the pope's privileges or authority are — although they outlined the way forward for future debate.

"This will not be easy; the road is very long and difficult," he said.

Orthodox scholars and officials have praised the document as a positive step toward healing the rift. But they have also noted that the recognition that the pope has primacy over all other bishops is, in practical terms, moot since the schism remains.

At the Ravenna meeting, the Russian Orthodox Church representatives walked out after an intra-Orthodox dispute with the representatives of the Ecumenical Patriarch, Bartholomew I.

Benedict has said that uniting all Christians is a "fundamental" priority of his papacy.

On Saturday, Benedict will preside over a ceremony to elevate 23 new cardinals. Eighteen of them are under age 80 and thus eligible to vote in a conclave to select a new pontiff.

Benedict will celebrate a Mass Sunday and give each new cardinal his ring, a symbol of the cardinal's communion with the papacy.

One of the over-80 new "princes of the church" is the Chaldean patriarch of Baghdad, Emmanuel III Delly, who has echoed Benedict's recent concern about the plight of Christians in Iraq and the region. He is Iraq's first cardinal.

The U.S. state of Texas is also getting its first cardinal in Archbishop Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston. Vatican observers have said he was tapped in recognition of the growing Latino presence in the U.S. Church.


Three of the cardinals-elect arrive for the plenary session this morning:
Angelo Bagnasdco of Italy, John Khue of Kenya, and Daniel Di Nardo of the USA.


[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/24/2007 1:20 AM]
11/23/2007 3:56 PM
 
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THE POPE'S DAY

Today is the Holy Father's day of prayer and reflection
with the members of the College of Cardinals at the New Synod
Hall of the Vatican, starting at 9:30 a.m.

- Recital of the Tierce (third liturgical office of the day)
- Address by the Holy Father
- Report by Cardinal Walter Kasper: "Information, reflections
and evaluation of the present situation in the ecumenical dialog"

- Discussions till 12:30 p.m.
The plenary session resumes at 5 p.m.
- Vespers
- The Pope will introduce a free discussion on problems of the church in general.
- The Pope's concluding address at 7 p.m.








THE POPE MEETS THE CARDINALS

Here is a translation of the Vatican communique after the morning session:


The Holy Father's meeting for prayer and reflection with the cardinals opened this morning at 9:30 with the recital of Tierce.

After a greeting by Cardinal Angelo Sodano, dean of the College of Cardinals, the Holy Father briefly introduced the theme he had chosen for today: the ecumenical dialog in the light of prayer and the Lrod's mandate 'Ut unum sint' (that they may be one).

The Pope also greeted Cardinal Sodano on the occasion of his 80th birthday today and thanked him for his faithful service.

Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, gave an introductory presentation in which he traced the main lines of the current ecumenical dialog and relationships. He distnguished three main areas of activity:

1. Relationships with the old Eastern churches and with the Orthodox churches.

2. Relationships with the ecclesiastical communities born in the wake of the 16th century Reformation.

3. Reports with charismatic and pentecostla movements that developed mostly in the last century.

He spoke of what has been achieved in each of these areas thus far and described the problems that remain open.

In the ensuing discussion, there was an ample exchange of experiences and opinions reflecting the variety of ecumenical situations. Seventeen cardinals spoke up, discussing now a common christian ecumenical effort could work together on social and charitable problems, as well as in defense of moral values in order to transform modern society.

In particular, the social doctrine of the Church and its actualization were indicated as one of the most promising fields in ecumenism.

Also discussed was a commitment to continue with the efforts to 'purify memory' and to use forms of communication that would be more careful to avoid wounding the sensibility of other Christians.

A deeper study of ecumenical problems was urged.

Also discussed were recent significant events like the Ecumenical Assembly in Sibiu, Romania, last September; the ecumenical and inter-religious world encounter in Naples; the visit of Patriach Alexei II to Paris; and the major ecumenical gahterings of church movements recently held in Stuttgart.

Likewise, the issue of a more ample rapport with Judaism was brought up.


The cardinals and the Pope leave after the morning session of today's plenary; right photo, Iraq's Cardinal-elect Dellay.





THE COMMUNIQUE ON THE EVENING SESSION

The meeting began at 5 p.m. with the recital of Vespers followed by interventions by the cardinals, of which there were 16.

The subject of ecumenism was further discussed with respect to collaboration among Christians of different confessions in the defense of the family in society and in juridical arrangements; the importance of spiritual ecumenism; and personal relationships with the faithful and authorities of other Christian confessions.

Some interventions concerned relations with Jews and Muslims. The letter of the 138 Muslim personages and the visit of the Saudi Arabian king to the Pope were seen as encouraging signs.

The discussions extended to the difficulties of the Christian faith in the secularized world; and the obligation and importance of a new evangelization which responds to post-modern man's profound and permanent expectations of happiness and freedom.

It was pointed out that in the Latin American continent, there is a new impulse of mission isnpired by the recent general conference of Ltin American and Caribeean bishops in parecida.

Specific interventions were addressed to the situation of the consecrated life in today's world and to priestly formation in seminaries.

Other topics discussed were the Holy Father's important letter to the Catholics of China and its favorable acceptance by the faithful and the bishops; and the urgency of the Church's commitment to peace, the battle against poverty, and disarmament, expecially nuclear.

Some informative interventions concerned the next International Eucharistic Congress (in Quebec), the Pauline year, and the circulation of the Catholic press, particularly of L'Osservatore Romano.

After a brief response by Cardinal Walter Kasper to some specific questions, the Holy Father made a concluding summary, thanking the cardinals for their participation and contributions.

He also announced the coming publication of his new encyclical dedicated to hope, in response to the most profound expectations of contemporary man.



[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/24/2007 12:57 PM]
11/23/2007 4:07 PM
 
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'SPE SALVI' WILL COME OUT ON NOV. 30



So not only will the Pope's second encyclical carry the date November 30, 2007, as its signing date, as Cardinal Bertone revealed yesterday, but it will also be released on that day.


VATICAN CITY, NOV 23, 2007 (VIS) - The new Encyclical of Benedict XVI, Spe salvi, will be presented in the Holy See Press Office at 11.30 a.m. on Friday, November 30.

The document will be presented by Cardinal Georges Marie Martin Cottier O.P., pro-theologian emeritus of the Pontifical Household, and by Cardinal Albert Vanhoye S.J., professor emeritus of New Testament exegesis at the Pontifical Biblical Institute.

The text of the encyclical will be available from 9 a.m. that day in Latin, Italian, French, English, German, Spanish, Portuguese and Polish.

[Yesterday, Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone told newsmen that the encyclical would be signed and dated Nov. 30, Feast of Saint Andrew, but indicated it was still intranslation and that the Vatican hoped it would be released by Christmas.]



Benedict's encyclical on hope
to be presented Friday

By JOHN L. ALLEN JR.
Rome

The Vatican announced today that the new encyclical of Pope Benedict XVI, titled Spe Salvi, or "Saved by Hope," will be presented on Friday, Nov. 30, in a Vatican press conference.

Described by sources who have seen the text as an "extremely spiritual" document, the encyclical will be presented by French Dominican Cardinal Georges Marie Martin Cottier, former theologian of the papal household under John Paul II, and Jesuit Cardinal Albert Vanhoye, an emeritus professor of exegesis at the Pontifical Biblical Institute.

(Some Roman wags observed that merely by bringing the Dominicans and Jesuits together, Benedict has already provided a sign of hope for peace in the church!)

Among other sources, the encyclical builds upon recent discussions about hope developed by the International Theological Commission, the chief advisory body to the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

The ITC was asked to reflect on the theological virtue of hope while then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger was still the prefect of the doctrinal congregation.

It was that reflection which led, among other things, to the ITC's consensus in favor of downplaying the notion of "limbo," referring to a special destination in the afterlife for unbaptized babies. Instead, the ITC concluded, Christians may hope that God's desire that all may be saved will also extend to infants who die without baptism.


And Richard Owen of the Times of London has updated his earlier report which was based on Cardinal Bertone's stateement yesterday. He ties it in with a good summary of the pre-consistory meeting and the consistory itself:


Pope to release encyclical on hope
after this week's consistory

By Richard Owen in Rome
November 23, 2007


Pope Benedict XVI will create 23 new cardinals, or “Princes of theChurch”, tomorrow including Iraq’s first ever cardinal, a sign of his concern over the plight of Christians in Iraq and the Middle East as a whole.

As cardinals gathered today from all over the world for the ceremony it emerged that Pope Benedict would shortly issue the second encyclical of his papacy, on the theme of 'Christian hope'.

The 81-page document, written during the summer both at the Pope’s retreat in the mountains of northern Italy and his summer residence south of Rome, will exhort Christians not to be afraid in the face of world upheavals, violence, rapid change and “human dramas” but rather to embrace “hope founded on faith”.

The document, to be issued on 30 November, is the 295th papal encyclical since the first was issued in 1740, and will be entitled Spe Salvi. Pope Benedict’s first encyclical in January 2006 was on charity and divine love, with the title Deus Caritas Est.

He is working on another encyclical on social and economic issues in an age of globalisation, but has decided to release the encyclical on hope first, Vatican sources said.

Encyclical letters are intended as guidance for the Church on matters of doctrine, morals or discipline. Spe Salvi takes as its text St Paul’s Letter to the Romans, 8, 24-25: “It was with this hope that we were saved. Now to see something is no longer to hope: why hope for what is already seen? But if we hope for something we do not yet see, then we look forward to it eagerly and with patience”.

Today Pope Benedict greeted the cardinals and cardinal-designates at an “extraordinary consistory” on ecumenism in the Vatican ahead of todays Saturday colourful ceremony on St Peters Square.

Cardinal Walter Kasper, head of the pontifical council for Christian unity, warned the gathering that the Catholic Church was losing members to Pentecostal and other charismatic and evangelical Protestant sects, and said it must “ask itself why”.

He said the Church needed a “self-critical pastoral examination of conscience” to confront the rise of such groups, which had 400 million followers worldwide, notably in Africa and Latin America.

“We shouldn’t begin by asking ourselves what is wrong with the
Pentecostals, but what our pastoral shortcomings are,” Cardinal Kasper said.

In Brazil alone the number of Roman Catholics is down from 90 percent half a century ago to 67 per cent.

Cardinal Kasper said Catholic dialogue with the Anglican church was “complicated” by internal Anglican divisions over issues such as gay priests. “I hope they can resolve these problems, but that is in their hands, not ours” he told The Times, adding that he hade “very good contacts” with Dr Rowan Williams, the Archbishop of Canterbury.

He gave the consistory details of a new document approved by a Vatican-Orthodox theological commission to heal the 1,000-year schism between the Catholic and Orthodox churches.

In the document, Catholic and Orthodox representatives both agreed that the Pope has primacy over all bishops, but did not agree what authority that gives him.

Cardinal Kasper said the document marked the first time Orthodox churches had agreed that there was a “universal level” of the church, and that the chief primate was the Pope as Bishop of Rome. But he warned that the road to full unity would be “very long and difficult”.

The document was agreed at a meeting at Ravenna last month at which Russian Orthodox Church representatives walked out after a dispute with representatives of the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople (Istanbul), Bartholomew I.

The new cardinals who will kneel before the Pope to be given their red hats and rings of office tomorrow include not only Emmanuel III Delly, the Chaldean Patriarch of Baghdad, but also Monsignor Sean Brady, the Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland. The move gives Ireland three cardinals and is seen by some Vatican observers as raising the prospect of a future papal visit to Northern Ireland as well as the Republic of Ireland.

[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/24/2007 4:42 AM]
11/23/2007 4:36 PM
 
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REPORTS ON TODAY'S CONSULTATIVE MEETING AND PRE-CONSISTORY

Here is a translation of various reports from the Italian media - first, from Repubblica online:

'Ecumenism is not an option
but a mandate for the Church'




Benedict XVI told cardinals today that "ecumenism is, for the Catholic church, a mandate, not an option for discussion", at the extraordinary meeting of the College of CArdinals which he convoked specifically to discuss the status of relations among Christian churches, on the eve of a consistory creating 23 new cardinals.

According to Coptic Patriarch Stephanos II Ghattas of Egypt, the Pope called on the cardinals to consider well particular points of the Ravenna document, and underscored that "Catholics should be an example for the world." Ghattas quoted the Pope as saying he was 'confident and optimistic' about the ecumenical dialog.

Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, underscored that the recognition by the Ravenna document of the Bishop of Rome as 'first among equls' among the patriarchs of Chistendom was a 'first step forward'.

He also said that the absence of the Russian Orthodox Church among the signatories of the Ravenna document was "a political question that does not affect the theological content of the document."

The following part is from an Apcom report:


Many cardinals, coming out of the morning session today, said the atmosphere was 'very cordial and familial'.

They said that the Pope, besides his introductory remakrs, also summed up the morning discussions at the end of the session.

France's Cardinal Ricard said about 15 cardinals animated the discussion that followeed Cardinal Kasper's presentation.

Cardinal Theodore McCarry, emeritus archbishop of Washington, DC, said he spoke up to underscore the importance of 'the social doctrine of the Church as a basis for ecumenical collaboration."

"I think that we should work with the Orthodox and the Protestants in concrete actions against poverty and on other social problems."

Cardinal Kasper, commenting on relations between the Catholic Church and the Russian Orthodox Church said, "we can say that our relations have considerably smoothened in the past few years - that there is no longer a freeze, but a thaw."

"From our point of view," he continued, "a meeting between the Holy Father and the Patriarch of Moscow would be useful....Moscow has never categorically ruled this out, but he (Alexei II) maintains that it is important to first resolve what he considers to be problems in Russia, but especially in the Ukraine....It must be remembered, however, that many encounters have taken place at various levels -among these, even the patriarch's recent visit to Paris, which on both sides, was considered a very important step."

On other parts of the ecumenical dialog, Cardinal Kasper said, "In my presentation, I also spoke about the Pentecostals. It is a problem that we should seriously consider and be aware of pastorally."

He added, howwever, that "the problem with the Anglicans is rather great, and we are pursuing it very closely in order to arrive at some resolution."

Vatican Radio adds the following:

Cardinal Kasper said, "Everyone spoke highly in favor of ecumenism - because everyone accepts that it is not an optional choice, that ecumenism is a sacred obligation. It is a mandate from our Lord....

"On the whole, it was a very positive discussion, and I am very satisfied. The Pope was very attentive, but it was he who said at the sart, 'There should be no doubt that ecumenism is our mandate'. At the end, he more or less confirmed the general lines I had indicated in my presentation."

With tomorrow's consistory, there will be 201 cardinals, of whom 120 will be electors.

They come from 69 countries. Italy has the most cardinals with 21, followed by the USA with 14. There are 104 European cardinals, 54 from the Americas, 21 Asians, 18 Africans, and four from Oceania.


======================================================================

Cardinals discuss Pentecostal threats
By NICOLE WINFIELD



VATICAN CITY, Nov. 23 (AP) - A senior Vatican cardinal told a gathering of the world's top prelates Friday that the Roman Catholic Church had to examine what it is doing wrong in the battle for souls who are leaving the church to join Pentecostal and other evangelical groups.

Cardinal Walter Kasper, who heads the Vatican's office for relations with other Christians, told a meeting of more than 100 cardinals that the church must undergo a "self-critical pastoral examination of conscience" to confront the "exponential" rise of Pentecostal movements.

"We shouldn't begin by asking ourselves what is wrong with the Pentecostals, but what our own pastoral shortcomings are," Kasper told the gathering, noting that such evangelical and charismatic groups count some 400 million faithful around the world.

The Vatican has been increasingly lamenting the rise of Protestant evangelical communities, which the Vatican describes as "sects," in Latin America, Africa and elsewhere and the resulting flight of Catholics. In Brazil alone, Roman Catholics used to account for about 90 percent of the population in the 1960s; by 2005 it was down to 67 percent.

The meeting came on the eve of Saturday's ceremony to elevate 23 new cardinals. As he did during his first consistory in 2006, Pope Benedict XVI asked the world's cardinals to come to Rome early for a meeting to discuss pressing church issues before the ceremony.

This year, Kasper briefed the cardinals on the church's relations with other Christians, focusing on the church's relations with the Orthodox, Protestants and Pentecostal movements.

Kasper said the rise of independent, often "aggressive" evangelical movements in places such as Africa had complicated the church's ecumenical task and made it more confused. Nevertheless, Kasper told reporters after the morning session that "ecumenism is not an option but an obligation."

Kasper opened his remarks by updating the cardinals and cardinal-designates on an important new document approved by a Vatican-Orthodox theological commission that has been working to heal the 1,000-year schism between the Catholic and Orthodox churches.

In the document, Catholic and Orthodox representatives both agreed that the pope has primacy over all bishops — although they disagreed over just what authority that primacy gives him.

The development is significant since the Great Schism of 1054 — which split the Catholic and Orthodox churches — was precipitated largely by disagreements over the primacy of the pope.

Kasper told the cardinals that the document was an "important turning point," since it marked the first time that Orthodox churches had agreed that there is a universal level of the church, that it has a primate, and that according to ancient church practice, that primate is the bishop of Rome — the pope.

"All the participants realize that this is just a first step and that the path toward full ecclesial communion will be long and difficult," he said.

Orthodox scholars and officials have praised the document as positive but they also noted that the recognition of the pope's primacy over all other bishops is, in practical terms, moot since the schism remains.

Kasper said that the Vatican's relations with the Russian Orthodox Church, in particular, had become "significantly smoother" in recent years.

"We can say there's no longer a freeze but a thaw," Kasper said.

Tensions between the two churches have been strained over Orthodox accusations that the Vatican is seeking converts on traditionally Orthodox territories, particularly in eastern Europe — charges that Rome denies.

The strain has precluded a meeting between a pope and Patriarch Alexy II, long sought by Pope John Paul II and pursued by Benedict.

Kasper noted that Moscow had "never categorically excluded" such an encounter.

Kasper said a recent document from the Vatican had created a "certain discontent" among Protestants, Lutherans and other Christian denominations spawned by the 16th century reformation.

The document issued this past summer contained nothing doctrinally new but repeated church teaching that other Christian communities were either defective or not true churches.

Kasper said the criticism that erupted after the document was released was "unjustified" but said the Vatican should review the form, language and way of presenting similar documents in the future.



Day One: Sights and Sounds of the Consistory
By JOHN L. ALLEN JR.
Rome
November 23, 2007


While the pageantry of the consistory reaches full flower tomorrow with the public ceremony in which 23 new members of the church’s most exclusive club receive their red hats, today marks the most important “business meeting” of the College of Cardinals.

At 9:30 am Rome time, some 140 cardinals and cardinals-to-be filed into the Vatican’s Synod Hall to meet with Pope Benedict XVI. After a half-hour of morning prayer, the cardinals were to hear a presentation from Cardinal Walter Kasper, President of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, and then to discuss the state of the church’s ecumenical efforts.

Symbolically, putting ecumenism at the heart of the agenda is intended by Benedict XVI to reinforce the Catholic church’s commitment to the quest for Christian unity, despite signs of paralysis and new upheavals in some of the church’s dialogues with other Christian bodies.

This afternoon, the cardinals have the opportunity over the course of two hours to raise whatever issues they like with the pope, who will then deliver a concluding address.

The business meeting is a closed-door affair, although a handful of members of the press were allowed in at the beginning to observe the opening prayer.

Outside the Synod Hall, reporters watched the various cardinals and cardinals-to-be arrive. When Archbishop John Foley arrived, the former President of the Pontifical Council for Social Communications and a figure well known to the world’s media, the press gallery broke into spontaneous applause. Foley was one of the few prelates to actually walk over to the press and offer a few words, referring to himself jokingly as “Il Cardinale dei Media.”



One reporter noted that Foley was still clad in his archbishop’s purple, leading him to explain that he won’t be a cardinal until tomorrow’s ceremony.

“The red goes on tomorrow,” he said.

Foley has been under the weather in recent days; he begged out of the Thanksgiving Mass at Santa Susanna, the American parish in Rome, on Thursday in order to save his strength for this weekend’s festivities. He told reporters this morning that he still isn’t feeling 100 percent, but is determined to make it through the next three days.

Before the morning prayer, reporters had the chance to greet several of the cardinals who were mingling in the atrium of the Synod Hall. Cardinal Stanislaw Dziwisz of Krakow, for example, the former private secretary of Pope John Paul II, came over to say hello.

Asked how he felt to be back in the Synod Hall, where he had accompanied John Paul innumerable times over the course of 23 years, Dziwisz said simply, “So many memories.”



Inside the Synod Hall, Benedict XVI arrived at 9:30 am as the cardinals stood and applauded. He was flanked on his right by Archbishop Francesco Monterisi, secretary of the Congregation for Bishops and also secretary of the College of Cardinals, along with Cardinal Angelo Sodano, the dean of the College. On the pope’s left were Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, the Secretary of State, and Kasper.

Sodano delivered a greeting to Benedict XVI in the name of the other cardinals, observing that today is the feast of St. Clement the Roman, listed in the Vatican Annuario as the third pope of the Catholic church.

Most cardinals arrived well ahead of the pope, though a few straggled in after the opening bell; Cardinal Godfried Danneels of Belgium, for example, arrived ten minutes late and quietly took a seat in the back row of the Synod Hall.



Archbishop Francisco Robles Ortega of Monterrey, Mexico arrives by car.
Cardinal Adrianus Johannes Simonis of the Netherlands arrives on his bicycle.



Reuters has more detail in its report:

Pope, cardinals discuss ties
with other Christians

By Tom Heneghan, Religion Editor


VATICAN CITY, Nov. 23 (Reuters) - Pope Benedict and his cardinals discussed Catholic relations with other Christians on Friday, highlighting efforts to work closely with the Orthodox and to meet the challenge of fast-growing Protestant churches.



The closed-door meeting, held on the eve of a ceremony to install 23 new cardinals, took place amid progress with the Orthodox - who broke from Rome in 1054 - but growing fragmentation in the Protestant and Anglican world.

The Roman Catholic Church, with 1.1 billion of the world's 2 billion Christians, seeks better ties with other Churches partly to strengthen the Christian message in the world.

A statement on the meeting said the cardinals also spoke briefly about ties with Jews and Muslims but gave no details. Islam is a pressing issue after 138 Muslim scholars called for a broad Christian-Muslim dialogue last month.

"We made good progress with the Orthodox in Ravenna," said Cardinal Walter Kasper, head of the department for Christian unity, referring to a Catholic-Orthodox meeting last month that agreed the Pope was the leading prelate of Christianity.

The Russian Orthodox Church, with more than half the world's 220 million Orthodox, quit that meeting in protest against the presence of an Estonian Orthodox Church aligned to the Orthodox Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, today's Istanbul.

"We are working now in Constantinople and Moscow that they find a solution or a compromise. It's a political question, not a theological one," Kasper told journalists.

The Russian Orthodox Church, which has become more active on the ecumenical scene since the fall of communism, chafes under the tradition that gives pride of place to Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomos, despite the fact his local church is tiny.

Kasper said a historic meeting between Pope Benedict and the Alexiy, the Russian Orthodox Patriarch, would be very helpful to improve relations but did not say when or where it might take place.

Kasper said talks with the Orthodox could not restore the hierarchy of the ancient church, which gave second place to Constantinople, but that the Orthodox agreed last month for the first time that the Pope still held first place.

"This can only be the Bishop of Rome," he said, using one of Benedict's titles. "There is no other candidate."

On relations with Anglicans, Kasper said the 77-million member Anglican Communion was in "a very difficult situation" with the challenges by traditionalists - many from the Third World - against liberal bishops in western countries.

The Anglican Communion is in internal crisis over the ordination of women and openly homosexual bishops.

"We hope they make a decision very soon. They cannot postpone all this crisis. There must be a decision made. But it is not in our hands."

Relations with Protestant Churches were getting more difficult because of "an inner fragmentation" among them, Kasper said. "Some of them have turned to liberal (positions) and there are now new ethical problems dividing them," he said.

He said that evangelical churches were spreading quickly and noted there were now 400 million Pentecostals around the world.

These two conservative Christian movements have been spreading especially rapidly in Latin America, often wooing away the faithful from the Catholic Church there.

"We must not ask first what is wrong with the Pentecostals but ask what is wrong with our pastoral work and come to a spitirual renewal," he said.



[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/24/2007 12:49 AM]
11/23/2007 7:29 PM
 
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CONSISTORY AND MASS TO TAKE PLACE INDOORS?



Translated from PETRUS just now:

VATICAN CITY - Weather forecasts for Rome this weekend have reportedly made Pope Benedict XVI decide to hold the public consistory tomorrow as well as the concelebrated Mass on Sunday, Feast of Christ the King, inside St. Peter's Basilica, and not in St. Peter's Square.

At least 40,000 pilgrims, representing the countries and dioceses of the 23 new cardinals, are expected to attend both ceremonies. Sectors will still be assigned in St. Peter's Square to accommodate the vast majority since the Basilica can only hold some 8,000 at the most.

Pilgrims who will not have access inside the Church will be able to follow the rites on four giant TV screens on the Square.

The consistory tomorrow will start with a prayer, after which the Pope will read out the ritual formula for the creation of a new cardinal and solemnly proclaim the individual names of the 23 new cardinals.

The new Cardinal Leonardo Sandri, who ranks first in the list, will then deliver a tribute to the Holy Fahter in the name of his colleagues. This will be followed by a profession of faith and of loyalty to the Pope by each of the new cardinals.

In the order of their creation, each one will approach the Pope and kneel before him to receive the red biretta which the Pope will place on the new cardinal's head, while saying: "Red as a sign of the dignity of the office, which means that you must be ready to act with fortitude, up to shedding blood, for the growth of the Christian faith, for the peace and tranqullity of the People of God, and for trhe freedom and spread of the Holy Roman Church."

The Pope then assigns to the cardinal a titular or diaconal church in Rome a a sign of his participation in the Pope's pastoral solicitude for the City (Urbe), handing over to the cardinal the Papal Bull of his proclamation as cardinal and the Church assignment.

The Pope and the new cardinal then exchange a kiss of peace, and the new cardinal goes on to share the same embrace with all the other cardinals.

The rite concludes with the prayer of the faithful, the recitation of the Lord's Prayer, and the final benediction from the Pope.

In the afternoon, each of the new cardinals will receive friends and wellwishers in various Vatican halls that have been previously assigned to each of them.

Generally, anyone is welcome to come to any of these 'open house' visits, which allows the general public a rare look at some of the Vatican's most famous halls and salons. The only requirement is to be appropriately dressed for the Vatican.

This year, besides halls in the Apostolic Palace and Aula Paolo VI, these visits will also take place at the Office of the Gonvernor of
Vatican City State, home ground for new Cardinal Giovnanni Lajolo, who holds that position, as well as the office of the Fabbrica di San Pietro, headed by new Cardinal Angelo Comastri, also Arch-priest of St. Peter's Basilica.

On Sunday, the 23 new caridnals will join the Pope in concelebrating the Mass honoring Christ the King, during which he will also give them their cardinal rings.

[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/23/2007 10:10 PM]
11/23/2007 7:56 PM
 
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POPE MAY VISIT MEXICO IN JANUARY 2009
Also from PETRUS, translated here:

The news agency ADNkronos reports that Pope Benedict XVI is considering a possible trip to Mexico City in January 2009 to attend the VI World Encounter for Families, which is just over a year away.

The Pope's continuing good health has raised the possibility. The only question to resolve is whether he will be able to tolerate the altitude of Mexico City, which has an elevation of about 7,400 feet. *

Vatican sources said they are encouraged that the Pope managed quite well during his trip to Brazil last May.

Benedict XVI attended the V World Encounter of Families in Valencia Spain last July, carrying out an appointment that had previously been committed to by John Paul II.

This time, it was Benedict himself who determined the time and place of the VI Encounter.

Mexico is the second largest Catholic nation in the world and was visited three times by John Paul II.

Vatican sources said that if a decision is made about the trip, it will be made known in the next six months, possibly at the start of summer.

=====================================================================


I looked up comparative altitudes. In 2005, the Pope visited Mont Blanc, which at its highest altitude is 15,500 ft, and the level reached by the Pope was at least 10,000 feet. Les Combes is situated at about 6000 feet. Lorenzago is at about 4000 feet altitude, although most of the Dolomite peaks in the area are around 6,000-7000 feet above sea level. So maybe, if the Pope had no problems with the altitude in Les Combes at 6000 feet, the additional 1400 feet altitude of Mexico City may be manageable. I wonder how his doctors will determine this! Generally, the altitude of Mexico City is not a problem for visitors unless one is going there to compete in a sport or has severe cardiac disease.

[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/24/2007 5:02 AM]
11/23/2007 9:54 PM
 
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MEMORY-MINDER ON POPE BENEDICT'S SECOND CONSISTORY




The Holy Father made the announcement at the end of his catechesis and messages at the General Audience of October 17, 2007 in these words:

ANNOUNCEMENT OF NEW CONSISTORY

I now have the joy of announcing that this 24 November, eve of the Solemnity of Christ the King, I will hold a Consistory at which, departing by one from the number established by Pope Paul VI, confirmed by my venerable Predecessor John Paul II in the Apostolic Constitution Universi Dominici Gregis (cf. n. 33), I will name 18 Cardinals. Here are their names.

1. Archbishop Leonardo Sandri, Prefect of the Congregation for the Oriental Churches;

2. Archbishop John Patrick Foley, Pro-Grand Master of the Knights of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem;

3. Archbishop Giovanni Lajolo, President of the Pontifical Commission and of the Governatorate of Vatican City State;

4. Archbishop Paul Joseph Cordes, President of the Pontifical Council "Cor Unum";

5. Archbishop Angelo Comastri, Archpriest of the Vatican Basilica, Vicar General for Vatican City State and President of the Fabbrica di San Pietro;

6. Archbishop Stanisław Ryłko, President of the Pontifical Council for the Laity;

7. Archbishop Raffaele Farina, S.D.B., Archivist and Librarian of Holy Roman Church;

8. Archbishop Agustín Garcia-Gasco Vicente of Valencia, Spain;

9. Archbishop Sean Baptist Brady of Armagh, Ireland;

10. Archbishop Lluís Martínez Sistach of Barcelona, Spain;

11. Archbishop André Vingt-Trois of Paris, France;

12. Archbishop Angelo Bagnasco of Genoa, Italy;

13. Archbishop Théodore-Adrien Sarr of Dakar, Senegal;

14. Archbishop Oswald Gracias of Bombay, India;

15. Archbishop Francisco Robles Ortega of Monterrey, Mexico;

16. Archbishop Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, U.S.A.;

17. Archbishop Odilo Pedro Scherer of São Paulo, Brazil;

18. Archbishop John Njue of Nairobi, Kenya.

I also wish to raise to the dignity of Cardinal three venerable Prelates and two well-deserving ecclesiastics, particularly praiseworthy for their commitment to the service of the Church:

1. His Beatitude Emmanuel III Delly, Patriarch of Babylon of the Chaldeans;

2. Archbishop Giovanni Coppa, Apostolic Nuncio;

3. Archbishop emeritus Estanislao Esteban Karlic of Paraná, Argentina;

4. Fr Urbano Navarrete, S.J., former Rector of the Pontifical Gregorian University; and

5. Fr Umberto Betti, O.F.M., former Rector of the Pontifical Lateran University.

* * *

Among the latter I had also wanted to raise to the dignity of Cardinal the elderly Bishop Ignacy Jez of Koszalin-Kołobrzeg, Poland, who died suddenly yesterday. Let us offer our prayers of suffrage for him.

* * *

The new Cardinals come from various parts of the world. This group clearly reflects the universality of the Church with the multiplicity of her ministries: besides Prelates praiseworthy for the service they have rendered to the Holy See, there are Pastors who expend their energy in direct contact with the faithful.

There would have been other people, very dear to me, who because of their dedication to serving the Church, would certainly deserve to be raised to the dignity of Cardinal. I hope to have the opportunity in the future to testify to my esteem and affection for them and the Countries to which they belong.

Let us entrust the newly elected to the protection of Mary Most Holy, asking her to help them in their respective offices so that they may be able to testify with courage in every circumstance to their love for Christ and the Church.






'Footnote' on some of the appointments, from John Allen:

The Consistory of the Long-Suffering
By JOHN L. ALLEN JR.
Rome

A consistory can always be approached from a variety of angles, and in the case of today’s elevation of 23 new cardinals by Pope Benedict XVI, one could make a good case for dubbing it “the consistory of the long-suffering.”

At least five of the men who will shortly receive their red hats from the pope this morning in a Rome ceremony, held indoors in St. Peter's Basilica because of inclement local weather, have long been bridesmaids rather than brides when it comes to joining the church’s most exclusive club: American Cardinal John Foley, German Cardinal Paul Josef Cordes, Irish Cardinal Sean Brady, Polish Cardinal Stanislaw Rylko, and Spanish Cardinal Agustín García-Gasco y Vicente.

Of the five, Foley has clearly been waiting the longest. He was appointed an archbishop and president of the Pontifical Council for Social Communications in 1984, at the age of 48, and only now becomes a cardinal at the age of 71. During that time, Foley watched eight consistories come and ago while 214 other men became cardinals.

Foley now serves as the Pro-Grand Master of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem.

A fellow Vatican official, Cordes has been an archbishop and president of the Pontifical Council “Cor Unum,” the Vatican’s main charitable agency, since 1995. Like Foley, Cordes was frequently mentioned as a candidate to become a cardinal over the last decade.

Unlike Foley, however, Cordes has been elevated while remaining in his current position. Most observers believe Benedict XVI wished to thank Cordes, among other things, for his role in drafting the second section of the pope’s December 2005 encyclical “Deus Caritas Est.”

Brady was appointed archbishop of Armagh, traditionally the primatial see in Ireland, in 1996. For some time, however, it was believed that the Vatican would not appoint a second Irish cardinal as long as Cardinal Desmond Connell of Dublin was still in office. Once Connell stepped down in 2004, speculation about the next cardinal focused more on his successor, Archbishop Diarmuid Martin of Dublin.

Instead, the patience of Brady, 68, was rewarded this morning.

Rylko was made an archbishop and secretary of the Pontifical Council for the Laity in 1995. Given his connection to Pope John Paul II, a fellow Pole, as well as to John Paul’s private secretary, now-Cardinal Stanislaw Dziwisz of Krakow, many felt at the time that Rylko would swiftly ascend to a position in which he would become a cardinal.

Despite being appointed president of the Council for Laity in 2003, however, Rylko, now 62, had to wait an additional four years before joining the college.

Finally, García-Gasco was appointed archbishop of Valencia in long-ago 1992, at the age of 61. Church-watchers in Spain at the time predicted a red hat in relatively short order, but instead he has waited 15 years, until the age of nearly 77, before making the cut.

[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/24/2007 6:27 PM]
11/24/2007 1:00 PM
 
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MORE STORIES ON THE PRE-CONSISTORY CARDINALS' MEETING

The Vatican Press Office posted it today but I have also posted this in the original story above (in THE POPE'sS DAY) to complete that report.
NB: The Osservatore Romano in its 11/24 issue has also published the full text of Cardinal Kasper's report on the state of ecumenism today. Will translate unless someone comes up with an English translation earlier.


THE COMMUNIQUE ON THE EVENING SESSION

The meeting began at 5 p.m. with the recital of Vespers followed by interventions by the cardinals, of which there were 16.

The subject of ecumenism was further discussed with respect to collaboration among Christians of different confessions in the defense of the family in society and in juridical arrangements; the importance of spiritual ecumenism; and personal relationships with the faithful and authorities of other Christian confessions.

Some interventions concerned relations with Jews and Muslims. The letter of the 138 Muslim personages and the visit of the Saudi Arabian king to the Pope were seen as encouraging signs.

The discussions extended to the difficulties of the Christian faith in the secularized world; and the obligation and importance of a new evangelization which responds to post-modern man's profound and permanent expectations of happiness and freedom.

It was pointed out that in the Latin American continent, there is a new impulse of mission isnpired by the recent general conference of Ltin American and Caribeean bishops in parecida.

Specific interventions were addressed to the situation of the consecrated life in today's world and to priestly formation in seminaries.

Other topics discussed were the Holy Father's important letter to the Catholics of China and its favorable acceptance by the faithful and the bishops; and the urgency of the Church's commitment to peace, the battle against poverty, and disarmament, expecially nuclear.

Some informative interventions concerned the next International Eucharistic Congress (in Quebec), the Pauline year, and the circulation of the Catholic press, particularly of L'Osservatore Romano.

After a brief response by Cardinal Walter Kasper to some specific questions, the Holy Father made a concluding summary, thanking the cardinals for their participation and contributions.

He also announced the coming publication of his new encyclical dedicated to hope, in response to the most profound expectations of contemporary man.

======================================================================

Practical cooperation, not doctrine,
is the new ecumenical frontier

By JOHN L. ALLEN JR.
Rome
Posted on Nov 24, 2007



Practical cooperation on social, cultural and political questions, rather than theological breakthroughs, seemed to be the new ecumenical frontier identified by the College of Cardinals yesterday during a day-long meeting with Pope Benedict XVI.

Opening the morning session, Cardinal Walter Kasper, President of the Pontifical Council for Christian Unity, gave an address offering an overview of the Catholic church’s ecumenical efforts in three areas:

• Relations with the ancient Eastern churches and with the Orthodox
• Relations with the denominations born of the Reformation
• Relations with charismatic and Pentecostal movements born in the last century

In each case, Kasper surveyed both steps forward as well as remaining challenges. His presentation did not hint at looming new breakthroughs at the level of formal doctrinal agreements. He argued that ecumenism is not “an optional choice, but a sacred duty.”

“We should not offend the sensibilities of others or seek to discredit them,” Kasper said. “We should not point the finger at what our ecumenical partners are not, and what they lack. Rather, we should give witness to the richness and the beauty of our faith in a positive and welcoming way. We expect the same approach from the others.”

With regard to the Orthodox, Kasper said that a long-awaited meeting between the pope and Patriarch Alexy II of Moscow would be “useful,” but did not offer new details of when or where such an encounter might occur.

Speaking to the press afterwards, Kasper noted that the crisis over the ordination of homosexual bishops has created serious new internal divisions within the Anglican Communion, as well as tensions in relations with the Catholic church.

Those tensions have also, however, generated momentum in more traditional quarters of Anglicanism towards individual conversion to Catholicism.

In recent days, two Episcopalian bishops in the United States, John Lipscomb of southwest Florida and Jeffrey Steenson of Texas and New Mexico, announced plans to join the Catholic church. Steenson is to be received into the Catholic church on Dec. 1 at the Basilica of St. Mary Major in Rome by Cardinal Bernard Law.

Kasper also said that rather than lamenting the recent growth of Pentecostalism, which exploded during the 20th century to number some 400 million believers, the Catholic church should ask itself what might be lacking in its own pastoral work.

Following Kasper’s address, 17 cardinals took the floor.

Cardinals Renato Martino, President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace; Crescenzio Sepe of Naples, former Prefect of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples; and Theodore McCarrick, the emeritus archbishop of Washington, all argued in favor of emphasizing a “practical” form of ecumenism, one that emphasizes cooperation on charitable and social endeavors.

Martino in particular said that the social doctrine of the Catholic church, and its application to contemporary humanitarian problems, offers great promise for ecumenical partnerships and a common Christian witness.

Building on Kasper’s point about not giving offense, there was some discussion of the recent declaration from the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith asserting that the famous phrase from the Second Vatican Council (1962-65) that the church of Christ “subsists in” Catholicism means that the Catholic church is the lone true church in the full sense.

Cardinal William Levada, Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, said the document had been “misunderstood” in some media reports, insisting that it was not intended to demean other Christian bodies.

Cardinal Julián Herranz, emeritus President of the Pontifical Council for Legislative Texts and one of two Opus Dei cardinals, argued that the Synod of Bishops should play a more formal role in dialogue with the Orthodox churches.

Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor of Westminster, England, repeated his proposal for a sort of “pan-Christian” summit involving leaders of all the major Christian bodies.

Cardinals Audrys Juozas Backis of Lithuania and Janis Pujats of Latvia stressed that a common battle against secularization offers especially promising ecumenical terrain with the Orthodox.

Coincidentally, the night before the cardinals met to discuss ecumenism, one of the world’s leading ecumenical experts lectured in Rome at the Centro Pro Unione.

Thomas Best, outgoing head of the Faith and Order Commission for the World Council of Churches, spoke on the 25th anniversary of the famed “Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry” document of the WCC, considered a watershed moment in the ecumenical movement.

Among other things, that text led most mainstream Christian bodies to recognize the validity of a common Christian baptism, so that it would no longer be necessary to “re-baptize” Christians who move from one church to another.

Best argued that “Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry” represented a sea change in ecumenical method, from what he called “comparison,” meaning dialogues intended to outline the differences between various Christian groups, to “convergence,” meaning efforts to articulate common positions based on shared faith.

Best offered several anecdotes to illustrate this convergence. At one point after the text appeared, he said, he took a flight across the Atlantic and found himself playing the role of the “meat in an ecumenical sandwich,” seated between a Southern Baptist on one side and a Roman Catholic priest on the other.

The Baptist, he said, discussed how his church was considering lowering the age of baptism to 8 in order to incorporate children into the church as quickly as possible, while the Catholic outlined proposals to raise the age of confirmation in order to ensure that those receiving the sacrament would know what they’re doing, and have a “personal experience of confessing the Lord.”

“The experts on adult baptism were worrying about the kids, and the experts on infant baptism were concerned about fostering an adult evangelical experience,” Best said.

At the same time, Best also conceded that the ecumenical landscape has seen a recent trend towards “re-confessionalization,” meaning a new accent on denominational differences.

“This can be good for dialogue if it means clarity about the differences that remain, but it’s bad if it isolates us or creates blockage and a sense of superiority over others,” Best said.

After his lecture, I asked Best to recommend one concrete step to Benedict XVI and the cardinals that could make a difference in ecumenical relations.

“A way to talk about the question of being able to share one Eucharist,” he replied. “I’m not proposing one Eucharist, and I’m not proposing Eucharistic hospitality. I know that’s not realistic. But we at least need a way to talk about it, a process.”


And in a separate item that I have not seen even in the Italian papers today:

Tauran promises response
to letter from 138 Muslims

By JOHN L. ALLEN JR.


Speaking yesterday to a meeting of the College of Cardinals with Pope Benedict XVI, French Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran, President of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, said that the Vatican will respond to a recent letter from 138 Muslim scholars to the pope and a cross-section of other Christian leaders.

Tauran mentioned the letter as well as the recent visit of King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia to Benedict XVI as positive developments in Catholic/Muslim dialogue. The Nov. 6 encounter between Benedict and Abdullah was the first meeting between a pope and a reigning Saudi monarch. (Abdullah met Pope John Paul II while he was still the Saudi crown prince.)

Addressed to Benedict XVI and 25 other Christian leaders, including the Patriarch of Constantinople and the Archbishop of Canterbury, the 28-page letter from Muslim scholars was released Oct. 11. Signatories include well-known figures from the Sunni, Shi’ite, Salafi and Sufi branches of Islam, representing more than 40 countries, including Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Egypt and Pakistan.

The document argues that the twin commands of love of God and love of neighbor provide common ground between the two traditions.

“Whilst Islam and Christianity are obviously different religions – and whilst there is no minimizing some of their formal differences – it is clear that the two greatest commandments are … a link between the Qur’an, the Torah and the New Testament,” it said.

On that basis, the Muslim leaders said, there is no necessary antagonism between the two faiths.

“As Muslims, we say to Christians that we are not against them and that Islam is not against them – so long as they do not wage war against Muslims on account of their religion, oppress them and drive them out of their homes,” the document says, referring to a passage in the Qur’an.

The initiative came on the one-year anniversary of a similar letter to Benedict XVI by 38 Muslim scholars after his Sept. 12, 2006, lecture at Regensburg, which fired Islamic protest by quoting a 14th century Byzantine emperor to the effect that Muhammad brought “things only evil and inhuman,” such as “his command to spread by the sword the faith he preached.”

John Esposito, director of the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown University, described the letter in early October as an “historic event,” saying it is the first time a cross-section of authoritative Islamic figures had issued a collective theological statement to Christians.

At the time, Tauran called the letter “an eloquent example of a dialogue among spiritualities” in comments to Vatican Radio.

“This represents a very encouraging sign, because it shows that good will and dialogue are capable of overcoming prejudices,” Tauran said.

At the same time, however, Tauran expressed caution about where such dialogue might lead.

Inter-religious dialogue can take place “with some religions,” he said in a mid-October interview with the French daily La Croix, “but with Islam, not at this time.”

“Muslims do not accept discussion about the Koran, because they say it was written under the dictates of God,” Tauran said. “With such an absolutist interpretation, it's difficult to discuss the contents of the faith.”




Cardinals say meeting with pope
shows his emphasis on Christian unity

By Cindy Wooden
Catholic News Service


VATICAN CITY, Nov. 24 (CNS) - The importance Pope Benedict XVI places on the search for Christian unity was evident in his decision to focus on ecumenism during a Nov. 23 meeting with members of the College of Cardinals, said two U.S. cardinals.

Cardinal William H. Keeler, the retired archbishop of Baltimore who has been involved in ecumenical and interfaith activities for years, said the fact that the pope chose ecumenism as the theme for the meeting shows "that this is a very vital thing for the church worldwide."

Cardinal Keeler, who was one of 33 cardinals to speak during the meeting, told Catholic News Service the discussion demonstrated that there are different experiences and levels of ecumenical dialogue.

"Different ecumenical forms have evolved in different parts of the world, and the progress in each region is different," he said.

"For the pope, ecumenism is not a subject for discussion, but a mandate," German Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity and the main speaker chosen by the pope to address the meeting, told journalists afterward.

The meeting brought together 120 cardinals and the 23 men Pope Benedict inducted into the College of Cardinals the following day. Sixteen prelates from the U.S., including the two to be inducted, participated; Cardinal Adam J. Maida of Detroit was ill and did not come to Rome.

While the discussion about ecumenism was planned for only the morning session, the Vatican said so many cardinals asked to comment on the topic that the discussion extended into the evening session.

Cardinal Roger M. Mahony of Los Angeles told CNS: "A big part of any dialogue is the personal relationship. We are not going to bring about Christian unity through theology, but through our personal relationships with Jesus Christ and with each other. That is what we will build unity on." ...

Cardinal Mahony said the cardinals did not make recommendations on how the pope should respond to the letter, but rather spoke about "the next step," which is likely to be "an invitation to open a new level of dialogue" with Muslim leaders.

At the end of the evening session, Pope Benedict summarized what he had heard "and announced the upcoming publication of his new encyclical dedicated to hope," a virtue that needs to be emphasized in the modern world "in response to the deepest expectations of our contemporaries," the Vatican said.

In his formal presentation, released by the Vatican, Cardinal Kasper told the cardinals that the overall status of ecumenism highlighted "the action of divine providence, which leads separated Christians toward unity in order to make their witness an increasingly clear sign before the world."

Still, the cardinal said, looking at all the ecumenical dialogues under way there is a sense of "fragmentation and centrifugal forces at work" with progress coming in some areas and differences deepening in others.

"While on one hand we work to overcome old controversies, on the other hand there emerge new differences in the field of ethics," particularly regarding human life, the family and homosexuality, Cardinal Kasper said.

While differences on moral questions are pushing Catholics and some Anglican and mainline Protestant communities further apart, they also are providing new terrain for improved relations with some evangelical and Pentecostal communities, he said.

Taken together, the charismatic and Pentecostal groups have an estimated 400 million members around the world and, among Christian communities, are second in size only to the Catholic community, Cardinal Kasper said.

Some of the communities are open to dialogue with the Catholic Church, he said, while others are hostile to Catholicism and aggressive in trying to win Catholic members.

The Pentecostals, he said, are responding to a desire among modern men and women for a strong spiritual experience.

Rather than talk about what is wrong with the Pentecostals, "it is necessary to make a pastoral examination of conscience and ask ourselves in a self-critical way why so many Christians are leaving our church," Cardinal Kasper said.

He told the other cardinals that in any ecumenical endeavor, dialogue makes sense only if it is based on a solid faith and a common search for truth.

[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/25/2007 4:57 AM]
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A full translation of the Pope';s homily at the Consistory today has been posted in HOMILIES, DISCOURSES, MESSAGES.


The outdoor crowd watches the consistory on maxi-screens; right, Cardinal Sandri gets his biretta.


Here is a translation of the Vatican bulletin describing this morning's ceremony:


At 10:30 today, in the Vatican Basilica, the Holy Father Benedict XVI held an Ordinary Public Consistory to create 23 new cardinals.

To open the consistory, which took the form of a Liturgy of the Word, the Holy Father, following the liturgical greeting, read the formula of creation and solemnly proclaimed the naems of the new cardinals.

The first among them, Cardinal Leonardo Sandri, Prefect of the Cingregation for Eastern Churches, delivered a message of homage and gratitude to the Holy Father in behalf of his colleagues.

After the reading of the Gospel, the Holy Father gave a homily.

The rite then continued with the profession of faith by the new cardinals before the People of God and their oath of loyalty and obedience to the Pope and his successors.

The new cardinals, in the order of their creation, knelt in front of the Holy Father, who placed on them the cardinal's biretta and assigned to each one a church in Rome as a sign of their participation in the Pope's pastoral solicitude in the Urbe (city).

After handing to each one the Papal Bull of their cardinal nomination and the assignment of their titular church or diaconate, the Holy Father exchanged with each one an embrace of peace.

The celebration concluded with a universal prayer, the Lord's Prayer, and the Pope's final blessing.

[DIM]8pt[DIM][The bulletin then provides the texts of the Holy Father's homily and Cardinal Sandri's homage. I have translated the homily; still must translate Cardinal Sandri's message.]


The first Italian news agency report comes from AGI, translated here:

A MAJESTIC RITUAL AT ST. PETER'S

VATICAN CITY, Nov. 24 (AGI) - Preceded by 23 new cardinals wearing their red vestments for the first time, Benedict XVI - with a miter of Pius IX and a 16th century gold cope once worn also by John Paul II - entered St. Peter's Basilica , which was chosen to be the setting for his second consistory.


Right photo, Cardinal Sandri pays homage to the Pope.

The decision to hold the rite within the Basilica was only partly due to inclement weather forecast. In fact, the interior of St. Peter's renders the ceremony more solemn.

In the crowd of 7,000, the front ranks at St. Peter's were occupied by the College of Cardinals, bishops of the Roman Curia, and representatives of governments and the diplomatic corps.

More than 20,000 faithful were in St. Peter's Square to watch the pcoeedings from giant TV screens.

Very long applause greeted Cardinal Leonardo Sandri, when, as first in the list of nominations for this consistory, he presented to the Pope the Chaldean Patriarch of Baghdad, His Beatitude Emmanuel II Delly, first in order of ecclesiastical precedence among all the new cardinals.


Left photo, Cardinal Delly greeted by Cardinal Sodano; right, greeted by Cardinals Re and Lopez Trujillo. .

"A special mention," Sandri said in his message of homage read in behalf of his colleagues, "is merited by the choice of a venerated representative of the Eastern Catholic churches, the Patriarch of Babylon of the Chaldeans, who finds himself carrying out his patriarchal service in tears, blood, and the sorrowful exodus of so many Christians from a land that also once saw the deoparture of Abraham, our common father in faith and hope, a land that was blessed with the grace of being one of the first to hear the proclamation of the Holy Gospel."

Addressing the Pope, Sandri said, "The (cardinal's) red refers to the Cross of Christ. We are and we will be with you, Most Holy Father, in the most demanding as well as the ordinary moments of your Petrine ministry. We wish to be with the Pope when he serves the truth and proclaims the primacy of God, as when he guides the church in renewal that comes from faithfulness to tradition; when he invokes peace, indicating the great power of prayer and dialog, as when he promotes the unity of all Christians and the respect of all religions and cultures, with the mutual exclusion of any form of violence."


The new cardinals, in order of creation (Cardinal Sandri, picured above, is #1):

The Curial Cardinals:


Cardinals Foley (USA) and Lajolo (Italy)


Cardinal Cordes (Germany) and Comastri (Italy)


Cardinals Rylko (Poland) and Farina (Italy)


The Metropolitan Cardinals:


Cardinals Garcia-Gasco of Valencia, Spain; and Brady of Armagh, Ireland


Cardnals Sistach of Barcelona, Spain; and Vingt-Trois of Paris


Cardinals Bagnasco of Genoa; and Sarr of Dakar, Senegal


Cardinals Gracias Of Mumbai (Bombay),India; and Robles Ortega of Monterrey, Mexico


Cardinals DiNardo of Galveston-Houston; and Scherer of Sao Paulo, Brazil


Cardinal Njue of Nairobi, Kenya


The Elders:


Cardinal Delly, Patriarch of Baghdad.


Cardinals Coppa of Italy (former Apostolic Nuncio)
and Karlic of Argentina (emeritus Archbishop of Parana).


Cardinals Navarrete of Spain (former rector of Gregorian University)
and Betti of Italy (former rector of Lateran Unviersity)




[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/25/2007 12:16 AM]
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UNEXPECTED GESTURE FROM THE POPE

An Apcom item, translated:




VATICAN CITY, Nov. 24 (Aopcom) - Pope Benedict XVI today unexpectedly came out to the entrance of St. Peter's Basilica to greet the tens of thousands of faithful in St. Peter's Square, at the end of the consistory held within the Basilica.

Here is a translation of what he said:

Dear brothers and sisters!

Welcome here, on the Piazza. Thank you for your presence. We have had rain today and so we were inside the Basilica. You stayed out here courageously and prayed with us.

I thank you for your prayerful presence, and for your participation in this important event for the Catholic Church. The new cardinals reflect the universality of the Church, her catholicity: the Church speaks in all languages, it embraces all peoples and all cultures.

We are all, together, the family of God. And as a family, we are gathered here to pray that the Lord bless these new cardinals in the service of all. Let us pray that our Lady may be with us at every step.

I wish you all a good weekend and safe return. Thank you for your presence. Arrivederci, and have a good day!

The crowd on St. Peter's Square followed the consistory rite on giant TV screens, on a day of strong winds and unseasonal cold. The unfavorable weather forecast had led to the decision to hold the rite inside the Basilica rather than outdoors.




Pope makes new cardinals,
calls for end to Iraq war

By Philip Pullella


VATICAN CITY, Nov. 24 (Reuters) - Pope Benedict, elevating 23 prelates from around the world to the elite rank of cardinal, made a pressing appeal on Saturday for an end to the war in Iraq and decried the plight of the country's Christian minority.

One of the new cardinals is Emmanuel III Delly, the Baghdad-based Patriarch of Babylon of the Chaldeans, and the Pope used the solemn occasion, known as a consistory, to express his concern for Iraq.

The other new cardinals come from Italy, Ireland, Germany, the United States, Spain, India, Argentina, Kenya, Mexico, Poland, Senegal, Brazil and France.

Speaking of Delly during the ceremony in St Peter's Basilica, Benedict said Christians in Iraq were "feeling with their own flesh the dramatic consequences of an enduring conflict ... "

The Chaldeans are Iraq's biggest Christian group and the Chaldean rite is one of the most ancient of the Catholic Church.

Many Iraqi Chaldeans have emigrated since the war started. The Vatican has expressed concern before that one of the countries with the oldest Christian traditions could be depleted of its faithful as many leave to escape the violence.

"Let us together reaffirm the solidarity of the whole Church with the Christians of that beloved land and invoke from the merciful God the coming of longed-for reconciliation and peace for all the peoples involved (in the conflict)," he said in his homily.

Wearing gold embroidered vestments, the Pope said in his sermon that he had chosen the Iraqi patriarch as a cardinal to express his spiritual closeness to suffering Iraqis.

Eighteen of the new cardinals are under 80 and eligible under Church rules to enter a secret conclave to elect a new pope after Benedict's death. The other five, including Delly, are over 80 and were given the honor for symbolic reasons or to thank them for long service to the Church.

The Pope bestowed the new "princes of the Church" with a biretta, a red hat whose color is meant to remind them that they may one day be called upon to shed their blood for the faith and the Church.


Right photo, Cardinal Schoenborn greets Cardinal Delly.

While the normal biretta has four corners and three vertical protruding fins, the Pope gave Delly a round hat in keeping with the sartorial tradition of the Chaldeans.



Delly received the most applause and supporters waved an Iraqi flag during the service.

Cardinals are the Pope's closest aides. They lead major dioceses around the world, head Vatican departments and advise him on matters affecting everything from faith to finances.

The new "electors" include Archbishop John Patrick Foley, a former Vatican official from the United States, Daniel N. DiNardo, Archbishop of Galveston-Houston, and Archbishop Paul Joseph Cordes, a German based in the Vatican.

Archbishops Andre Vingt-Trois of Paris, Oswald Gracias of Bombay, Francisco Robles Ortega of Monterrey, Mexico, John Njue of Nairobi and Sean Baptist Brady - Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland - will also be electors.

It was the second time since his election in April 2005 that the Pope has elevated cardinals to put his stamp on the Church. The first consistory was in March 2006, when he installed 15.

Church law sets a ceiling of 120 on the number of "cardinal electors." The total number of cardinals, including those over 80, is now 201.

The late Pope John Paul held nine consistories during his 26-year reign and created more than 200 cardinals. All but 2 of the prelates who entered the conclave following his death in April, 2005 had been made cardinals by him.

(Reporting by Philip Pullella and Tom Heneghan, editing by Peter Millership)



POPE VOICES CLOSENESS TO IRAQIS



VATICAN CITY, Nov. 24 (AFP) - Pope Benedict XVI said Saturday that by elevating the patriarch of Babylon for the Chaldeans to the rank of cardinal he wished to express his spiritual closeness and affection for Iraqis.

By inducting Emmanuel III Delly into the College of Cardinals, "I intend to express in a concrete way my spiritual closeness and my affection for these people," the pope said at a Vatican ceremony creating 23 new cardinals.

"I think now with affection of communities entrusted to your care and, especially, to those most tried by suffering, challenges and difficulties of various kinds," he said.

"Among them, how can one not turn one's gaze with apprehension and affection, in this moment of joy, to the dear Christian communities in Iraq?" he asked, drawing loud applause from the prelates assembled in Saint Peter's Basilica.

"These brothers and sisters of the faith are experiencing in the flesh the dramatic consequences of a lasting conflict and live in a fragile and delicate political situation," he said.



Emmanuel III, the 80-year-old spiritual leader of Iraqi Christians, said Friday that the honour was for "all Iraqis."

"The title of cardinal that the pope has accorded me is not for my poor self alone but for all Iraqis, both those who still live in our tortured country and those who have emigrated," he told reporters.

"I will continue to serve Iraq and all the ethnic and religious groups of the country who should be united. I will serve my country, Iraq, to the last drop of my blood," he said.

Emmanuel III said Benedict had referred to his nomination as a "sign of reconciliation ... between Christians and all the Muslims, whether Sunni or Shiite."

The pope has repeatedly called for dialogue between Christians and Muslims to combat intolerance and violence.


Pope elevates 23 new cardinals
By NICOLE WINFIELD


VATICAN CITY, Nov. 24 (AP) - Pope Benedict XVI elevated 23 churchmen from around the world to the top ranks of the Catholic Church hierarchy Saturday, telling them they must be willing to shed their blood to spread the Christian faith.

Wearing resplendent golden robes and a 19th century gilded bishop's hat once worn by Pope Pius IX, Benedict presided over his second consistory, bringing to 120 the ranks of cardinals who will eventually choose his successor.

To the applause of the crowd, each new cardinal knelt down before Benedict, who from a gilded papal throne on the altar in St. Peter's Basilica placed a red hat on each man's head.

He told them that the red signifies the dignity of their new office and that they must be ready to work, "even to the point of spilling your blood, for the increase of the Christian faith, for peace and harmony among the people of God, for freedom and the spread of the Holy Roman Catholic Church."

On Sunday, Benedict was to give each new "prince" of the church his cardinal's ring, his personal gift to each one.

Eighteen of the 23 new cardinals are under age 80 and thus eligible to vote in a conclave to elect a future pontiff. Benedict also named five elderly cardinals to honor them for their service to the church.

Among them is the 80-year-old Chaldean Patriarch of Baghdad, Emmanuel III Delly, whom Benedict singled out in his homily, saying his decision to include the patriarch in the College of Cardinals was a concrete sign "of my spiritual closeness and my affection" for the Christians in Iraq.



"Our brothers and sisters in faith are experiencing in the flesh the dramatic consequences of an ongoing conflict and are living in an extremely fragile and delicate political situation," Benedict said to applause from the crowd.

The service, while solemn, seemed to have a festive air to it as the new cardinals — decked out in their new red cassocks — processed down the aisle of the basilica greeting well-wishers. The crowd interrupted Benedict several times with applause and cheers as he pronounced each new cardinal's name from an altar decorated with red roses.

Benedict's vestments were particularly ornate: He donned a long, golden silk cape, embroidered with scenes from the life of the saints that was held up by two altar servers as he processed down the main aisle.

Delly had unusual vestments as well, since he is a patriarch from an Eastern rite church: Rather than wearing the red cassock with a white lace or linen tunic that the other cardinals donned, Delly wore all crimson. He also got a round, black-trimmed red hat rather than the three-pointed red "biretta."

On Friday, Delly said he had told Benedict that he hoped being named Iraq's first cardinal would help bring peace and reconciliation to the country.

"The entire Iraqi people have been honored," Delly told a news conference. "I'm happy that they're happy, so that peace, reconciliation will reign in this tortured country."

Benedict has been outspoken in recent months in lamenting the plight of Christians in Iraq and in the Middle East in general. Delly sidestepped questions about the state of the Christian community in Iraq, saying that all Iraqis were being targeted.

"It's true, sometimes the Christians suffer more, for so many reasons, but what is happening is happening to all Iraqis equally," he said.

After Saturday's ceremony, there will be 201 members of the College of Cardinals, 120 of whom can vote in a conclave. Europe claims the lion's share, with 104 cardinals, followed by 34 from Latin America, 20 from North America, 21 from Asia, 18 from Africa and four from Oceania.


Pope says new Iraqi cardinal
a sign of 'spiritual closeness'

By JOHN L. ALLEN JR.
Rome
Posted on Nov 24, 2007



Popes rarely speak out loud their reasons for making a particular prelate a cardinal, but Pope Benedict XVI broke that informal taboo today with regard to Patriarch Emmanuel II Delly of the Chaldean church in Iraq.

“How can we not look with apprehension and affection, in this moment of joy, to the dear Christian community in Iraq?” the pope said during his homily at this morning’s consistory ceremony.

“These brothers and sisters of ours in the faith are experiencing in their own flesh the dramatic consequences of a long-lasting conflict, and are living today in an extremely fragile and delicate political situation,” the pope said.

“By calling the Patriarch of the Chaldean Church to enter into the College of Cardinals, I wanted to express in a concrete way my spiritual closeness and my affection for this population. We wish together, dear and venerable brothers, to reaffirm the solidarity of the entire church with the Christians of that beloved country. We invite and invoke the merciful God, for all the peoples involved, that the longed-for reconciliation and peace may come.”

The pope's references to Iraq brought three rounds of applause from those gathered in St. Peter's Basilica.

Twenty years ago, Iraq had an estimated Christian population of 1.4 million, one of the largest in the Muslim world. After the fall of Saddam Hussein, however, Iraqi Christians have been caught in a three-way squeeze created by political instability, economic collapse and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism, with the result being what some analysts call a Christian “exodus” out of the country.

In 2005, estimates were that more than 40 percent of all refugees fleeing Iraq were Christian. Today, the conventional figure is that at least one-quarter, and perhaps as much as one-half, of Iraq’s Christians have left the country. Those figures do not take into account Iraqi Christians who are internally displaced.

As one example of the pressures facing Iraqi Christians, a Catholic priest and three subdeacons were gunned down in front of their church in Mosul, Iraq, last June. The priest, Ragheed Aziz Ganni, had studied at Rome’s Gregorian University, and two years earlier he had described the suffering of Chadlean Catholics in Iraq during a presentation at a Eucharistic Congress in Bari, Italy: “The terrorists hope to kill us physically, or at least spiritually, making us deny ourselves out of fear. Because of the violence of the fundamentalists against young Christians, many families have fled.”

(In a moving footnote, a Muslim professor at the Gregorian who had befriended Ganni, named Adnan Mokrani, wrote a letter to his murdered friend, expressing anguish: “In the name of which god did they kill you? In the name of what paganism did they crucify you?... Did they really know what they were doing?” he asked.)



Scenes from St. Peter's:






Cardinal Foley before the rites, ;eft, and Cardinal Di Nardo just after getting the biretta.


Left, Cardinal Foley after getting the biretta; Right, Cardinal Rouco Varela of Madrid greets new Cardinal Karlic of Argentina.

======================================================================

From Al-Jazeera online:

Iraqi among pope's new cardinals

Emmanuel III, who is 80, said that the
honour was for 'all Iraqis'



Pope Benedict XVI has elevated 23 prelates from around the world to the position of cardinal and delivered a pressing appeal for an end to war in Iraq.

One of the new cardinals is Emmanuel III Delly, the Baghdad-based Patriarch of Babylon of the Chaldeans.

During a ceremony in St Peter's Basilica on Saturday, the pope said Christians in Iraq were "feeling with their own flesh the dramatic consequences of an enduring conflict".

The Chaldeans are Iraq's biggest Christian group and the Chaldean rite is one of the oldest in the Catholic Church.

Many Iraqi Chaldeans have emigrated since the war started in 2003 and the Vatican has expressed concern that a country with one of the most ancient Christian traditions could be depleted of its faithful.

Protected under Saddam Hussein, there were 700,00 Christians in Iraq. It is now thought that only half that number remain.

The pope said: "Let us together reaffirm the solidarity of the whole Church with the Christians of that beloved land and invoke from the merciful God the coming of longed-for reconciliation and peace for all the peoples involved [in the conflict]."

He said in his sermon that he had chosen the Iraqi patriarch as a cardinal to express his spiritual closeness to suffering Iraqis.

Other new cardinals came from Germany, Poland, Spain, Ireland, France, Brazil and Kenya, Senegal, India, Mexico, Italy, Argentina and the US.

Emmanuel III, who is 80, said that the honour was for "all Iraqis".

He said: "The title of cardinal that the pope has accorded me is not for my poor self alone but for all Iraqis, both those who still live in our tortured country and those who have emigrated.

"I will continue to serve Iraq and all the ethnic and religious groups of the country who should be united. I will serve my country, Iraq, to the last drop of my blood."

He said the pope had referred to his nomination as a "sign of reconciliation... between Christians and all the Muslims, whether Sunni or Shiite".

The pope has repeatedly called for dialogue between Christians and Muslims to combat intolerance and violence.



====================================================================

OFFICIAL DELEGATIONS TO THE CONSISTORY


French Minister Marie-Aliot chats with Italian Vice-Premier Francesco Rutelli.

Following info from Avvenire:

SPAIN: María Teresa Fernández de la Vega, Deputy Prime Minister and the mayor of Valencia, Francisco Camps. Three Spaniards are among the new cardinals (Sistach, Garcia-Gasco and Navarrete).

FRANCE: Michele Aliot-Marie, Interior Minister, for the Archbishop of Paris,Andre Vingt-Trois.

POLAND: Robert Draba, chief of the President's Chancellery. (President Kaczynski is travelling in Georgia, and the new Premier, Donald Tusk, was to appear in Parliament today to get permission to form a new government). However, new Cardinal Rylko could also count on the two cardinals of Cracow, Dsizwis and Macharski (emeritus).

IRAQ: Vice President Abdel Adel Mehdi, a Shia, representing President Talebani; Minister for Human Rights Wajdan Michael, a woman and a Christian;and a representative of the Kurdish autonomous government.


EASTERN PATRIARCHS: Syro-Catholic Patriarch Ignace Pierre VIII and Armenian Catholic Patriarch Nerses Bedros.


WHAT DID THEY DO WITH THE FLOWERS FOR OUTDOORS?

Avvenire says the Vatican had ordered from San Remo 8,000 roses (1000 white, 2000 yellow, 4000 red), 6,000 carnations (4,00 red and 2000 of various colors), 300 giant ferns, 300 branches of Mirio claudius, and 10 kilos of rusks.

They also ordered thousands of sprigs of Rosa mistica to decorate the reception salons for the new cardinals.

[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/24/2007 11:56 PM]
11/24/2007 6:12 PM
 
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BENEDICT'S SECOND CONSISTORY: SPLENDOR IN GOLD AND RED





In this wonderful photograph posted by Caterina, the ritual six candelabra are on the altar behind the Pope.
But since the altar is behind him, Mons. Guido Marini has placed a slim Crucifix in front of the Pope
(on a red-and-gold base at the top of the steps leading to the crypt, in lower right hand side of photo).

For a better view, click on thumbnail 2x for full size.




As previously announced by the Office of Pontifical Liturgical
Celebrations, the Pope chose to wear for the second Consistory
of his Pontificate a golden cope thought to date to the 16th
century, and also worn once by John Paul II, with a golden miter
that was worn by Blessed Pius IX when he proclaimed the dogma
of the Immaculate Conception.



Left photo shows both the cope and the miter in enough detail, as well as a lacy alb that also seems to have been
dusted off from the untold wealth of Papal liturgical vestments kept in the Sacristy of St. Peter's Basilica.
Right photo shows a Papal 'throne' also taken from storage into current use by Mons. Guido Marini, who is also
seen here in one of the rare photos today that show him.



The Papal cope is held up by two attendants.
Below left, detail of the cope; and below right, detail of the back panel.








The Vatican has released the titutlar churches and diaconates assigned to the new cardinals. Zadok says on his blog that Pagtriarchs are not assigned titles in Rome, hence Cardinal Delly is not assigned one.


ASSIGNMENT OF TITULAR CHURCHES AND DIACONATES
TO THE NEW CARDINALS



1. Sua Beatitudine EMMANUEL III DELLY
2. Card. LEONARDO SANDRI Diaconia dei Santi Biagio e Carlo ai Catinari
3. Card. JOHN P. FOLEY Diaconia di San Sebastiano al Palatino
4. Card. GIOVANNI LAJOLO Diaconia di Santa Maria Liberatrice a Monte Testaccio
5. Card. PAUL J. CORDES Diaconia di San Lorenzo in Piscibus
6. Card. ANGELO COMASTRI Diaconia di San Salvatore in Lauro
7. Card. STANISLAW RYŁKO Diaconia del Sacro Cuore di Cristo Re
8. Card. RAFFAELE FARINA Diaconia di San Giovanni della Pigna
9. Card. GARCÍA-GASCO VICENTE Titolo di San Marcello
10. Card. SEÀN BAPTISTA BRADY Titolo dei Santi Quirico e Giulitta
11. Card. LLUÍS MARTÍNEZ SISTACH Titolo di San Sebastiano alle Catacombe
12. Card. ANDRÉ VINGT-TROIS Titolo di San Luigi dei Francesi
13. Card. ANGELO BAGNASCO Titolo della Gran Madre di Dio
14. Card. THÉODORE-ADRIEN SARR Titolo di Santa Lucia a Piazza d’Armi
15. Card. OSWALD GRACIAS Titolo di San Paolo della Croce a “Corviale”
16. Card. FRANCISCO ROBLES ORTEGA Titolo di Santa Maria della Presentazione
17. Card. DANIEL N. DiNARDO Titolo di Sant’Eusebio
18. Card. ODILO PEDRO SCHERER Titolo di Sant’Andrea al Quirinale
19. Card. JOHN NJUE Titolo del Preziosissimo Sangue di Nostro Signore Gesù Cristo
20. Card. GIOVANNI COPPA Diaconia di San Lino
21. Card. ESTANISLAO ESTEBAN KARLIC Titolo della Beata Vergine Maria Addolorata a Piazza Buenos Aires
22. Card. URBANO NAVARRETE Diaconia di San Ponziano
23. Card. UMBERTO BETTI Diaconia dei Santi Vito, Modesto e Crescenzia


The Office of Liturgical Celebrations also announced the first three cardinals to formally 'take possession' of their titular churches:

Monday, Nov. 26, 17:00 - Cardinal Angelo Bagnasco

Tuesday, Nov. 27, 17:00 - Cardinal James Foley

Sunday, Dec. 2, 18:30 - Cardinal Sandri


More images from this morning:
















I think this is the appropriate place for this translation. The Press Office rarely gives us the text of these customary introductory homages that precede a papal address, so this is very welcome.

HOMAGE TO THE HOLY FATHER
DELIVERED BY CARDINAL SANDRI
ON BEHALF OF ALL THE NEW CARDINALS



Most Blessed Father,

I have the honor to express the most profound and sincere gratitude in the name of the 23 new Cardinals that Your Holiness has added today to the College of Cardinals.

Because of your benevolence, Holy Father, we find ourselves at this solemn moment by the tomb of the Apostle Peter and his Successor.

United to the Most Blessed Mary, we feel gushing forth from our hearts her hymn of joy and gratitude: "My soul doth magnify the Lord...The Almighty has wrought great things in me...He has elevated the humble" (Lk 1,46-55).

Holiness, this second creation of cardinals during your Pontificate confirms the variety and universality of the Holy Church: Receiving the dignity of the cardinalate along with some Prelates of the Roman Curia are Pastors of distinguished and ancient churches of Christian Europe, and Pastors of flowering Churches in the great metropoli of Africa, Asia and the Americas.

A special mention is merited by your choice of a venerated representative of the Oriental Catholic churches, the patriarch of Babylonia of the Chaldeans, who finds himself carrying out his patriarchal service amid tears and blood and the sorrowful exodus of so many Christians from the land that also saw at one time the departure of Abraham, our common father in faith and hope, a land which was among the first to have the grace of hearing the Holy Gospel proclaimed.

The color red, moreover, refers to the Cross of Christ. In placing on us the cardinal's biretta, You, Your Holiness, will exhort us "to be ready to act with fortitude up to the shedding of blood for the growth of the Christian faith, for the peace and tranquillity of the People of God, and for the freedom and dissemination of the Holy Roman Church."

Among so many joys and consolations that we reap everyday from the People of God, we also note, in fact, that there is no lack of martyrdom, persecution, tribulation and mockery because of the name of the Lord Jesus, and for being faithful to the Church and the Pope. But we feel intimately comforted and encouraged by the promise of the Lord: "Behold, I will be with you all the days up to the end of the worold" (Mt 28,20).

It is the same divine Word that sustains the suffering testimony of the sons and daughters of the Christian Orient, starting with those who live in the land where our Redeemer was born.

Your Holiness has called us to join the Clergy of the most beloved Church of Rome, enlisting us among your closest and most trusted advisers. And we wish to assure you of our most faithful and loyal collaboration.

We are and we will be with you, Most Blessed Father, in the most demanding as well as the ordinary moments of your Petrine ministry. We wish to be with the Pope when he serves the truth and proclaims the primacy of God, as when he guides the church in renewal that comes from faithfulness to tradition; when he invokes peace, indicating the great power of prayer and dialog, as when he promotes the unity of all Christians and the respect of all religions and cultures, with the mutual exclusion of any form of violence.

Wuth you, Holy Father, we wish to serve the cause of man. We are with you when you reaffirm that a person without God loses himself; when, making yourself into a true defensor hominis, you teach that matrimony and the family are the original cells of society, that life must be protected from its very beginning to its natural end, that the fundamental rights of everyone, especially religious freedom, should be respected and demanded; when you defend the dignity of the human person in the face of every oppression.

Yes, we are with the Pope when, in the sweet name of Jesus, he is an advocate for children and youth as of the aged, the poor and the needy, the unemployed, the refugees and the migrants.

May Christ the Good Shepherd, King of the universe and of history, confirm you with the ample effusion of his Holy Spirit so that you may be for the Church and for the world a sign of the love of God, who is Father of all.

May the Lord bless and protect Your Holiness and keep you a joyous laborer in his vineyard.

Thank you, Holy Father!

[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/25/2007 4:50 AM]
11/24/2007 6:26 PM
 
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Congratulations to the new cardinals!
Please let me join you in prayer that these "Papa's men" will have
"—an honest intention, an absence of private ends, a temper of obedience, a willingness to be corrected, a dread of error, a desire to serve Holy Church-"(JOHN H. CARDINAL NEWMAN)
[Edited by lutheranguest 11/24/2007 6:34 PM]
11/24/2007 10:22 PM
 
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Encore!
Congratulations to every new cardinal. And may Cardinal Newman's words always echo in their minds and hearts. The ceremony of this morning was beautiful and touching. The RCC at its very best. Congratulations Catholic friends. I know you will all support the Holy Father in his mission to preserve not only truth and the Truth but also beauty and the Beauty in the life of the church and in its ceremonies and liturgy. [SM=g27811]
11/25/2007 1:01 AM
 
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Pulling out all the stops
Yes, the RCC at its best when we understand the significance of the vestments, the role of the cardinal, and all come together in a love for the Church. And didn't our Holy Father look wonderful in the vestments - the detail of the cope and miter and the beauty even of the Chair. What else is back there? I hope Mons Marini makes more good choices like these. I wonder how the choir sang? Did anyone watch the EWTN live feed?

[SM=g27823] [SM=g27823] [SM=g27823]
11/25/2007 12:47 PM
 
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What a magnificent weekend!!!!
I'm walking on air!!! Yes, I watched yesterday's Consistory and have just watched the first Mass of the new cardinals, with receiving of rings from our Papa, then the Angelus address and recitation and blessing from outside Saint Peter's. A huge, huge crowd in the Piazza, despite the rain! Who cares about rain when you are THERE - I know what it's like!

And, I must echo our friends in this thread. Both ceremonies were exceptionally beautifully, both visually and audibly. The singing seemed to have been lifted up to the angels! The intoning and chanting in Latin were out of this world - the best yet!

Papa's cope and mitre yesterday exceeded everything he has yet worn for their beauty and his chasuble today - plain, lovely gold with that embroidery [ I suppose it was embroidery] of Our Lady with the Child Jesus on the front....were MAGNIFICENT!!!!!!!

Thank you for the photos already posted. I'll try to so some stills from my video.

This pontificate just gets better and better!
Papa Benedetto - we love you SO VERY MUCH!!!!!

11/25/2007 1:00 PM
 
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AMEN to all that, Mary!
11/25/2007 2:33 PM
 
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RESERVED FOR WRAP-UP STORIES OF THE CONSISTORY FROM TODAY'S PAPERS


[Edited by TERESA BENEDETTA 11/26/2007 1:43 AM]
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